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help with bookmatched table

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guy dewdney06/01/2013 07:48:20
12 forum posts

hi,

first big scary project for me.

i am trying to work out how to do a part of a bookmatched corner table out of ahuge piece of elm.

the basic design is the two main planks, 16" wide will be cut to length and the ends cut at 45 degrees to create a simple L shape. so far so simple. the problem is inside the corner, where i want to make it wider using some of the offcuts. the corner fillet is radiused.

any suggestions on how to make this look 'right' ? all i can see is a mess, and the 'fillet' looking really out of place.

the table is for the wife to use as her main office desk, and swmbo has asked for this shape

thanks in advance

guy.

Derek Lane07/01/2013 11:56:19
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Moderator
3204 forum posts
990 photos

Hello Guy have been looking at your small problem and the only thing I can think of is to have the two wings with the grain running along there length and the corner with the grain running at 45 deg but you would need to at least double up in the corners at least it is easier to match grain along its length

See my diagram below arrows show grain direction.

table top

Hope this is how you are making it

Ivor the engine07/01/2013 18:46:49
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270 forum posts
46 photos

Very good Derek thats how i would do it a bit of waste but there you go if one could flip boards over at each joint cut less waste ?.

Take care,

Ivor.

guy dewdney07/01/2013 19:59:27
12 forum posts

ah, inpired! will report back with pics as soon as i get a moment to look at it. my kit consists of a dewalt dw110 radial arm saw, matching planer thicknesser, cheapo b&q tiny bandsaw, good blue bosch belt sander and all the accessories, old skool nu tool morticer etc. physically, i can do this, but its the finish of the joints thatvworries me, with such an expensive bit of wood. its been down for about fivevyears and stickered up in an airy barn all that time, so it shouldnt move too much, as its also the middle section of the tree.

guy

Derek Lane07/01/2013 20:14:13
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Moderator
3204 forum posts
990 photos

Before you start any preparation of the wood take it in to the house for at least 3-4 weeks as it will still have moisture in it. Then work on it after that otherwise it will probably move.

Look forward to the build

Keith Smith07/01/2013 23:39:32
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83 forum posts
5 articles

The main problem of making wide mitres is that the joint will almost certainly open up at the front edge as the wood dries out. You could do with finding out its moisture content which should be about 10% for this job but I would expect it to be about 16% if it has been stored outside. There is no easy cure and other than getting it kiln dried I would think that you would be better off if you store the timber in the house for six months at least. Sorry to put a dampener on things but this type of joint is always a problem even with kiln dried timber.

guy dewdney08/01/2013 18:07:50
12 forum posts

i have a moisture meter i bought for firewood. the barn it was stored in was closed, dry, and reasonablywell ventilated.

i shall bring it in after measuring the outside surface moisture content. then i have to work out how to keep it dead flat and dry, part of the problem is that the mrs is a wheelchair user, and floorspace is at a premium.

Eugene Anderson19/01/2013 10:52:11
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47 forum posts
21 photos
Posted by Keith Smith on 07/01/2013 23:39:32:

The main problem of making wide mitres is that the joint will almost certainly open up at the front edge as the wood dries out. You could do with finding out its moisture content which should be about 10% for this job but I would expect it to be about 16% if it has been stored outside. There is no easy cure and other than getting it kiln dried I would think that you would be better off if you store the timber in the house for six months at least. Sorry to put a dampener on things but this type of joint is always a problem even with kiln dried timber.

Then use biscuits, or even better, insert a plywood spline almost full length of the joint.

Andy

John Kinch19/01/2013 13:08:20
206 forum posts
91 photos

I sometimes store large flat items like this under my double bed which leaves the room clear for access

John k.

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