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Goblets

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Steve J W18/08/2012 21:06:45
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137 forum posts
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I have set myself the task of making a goblet but i am finding it hard to turn the end grain, also my chuck has come open a few times, perhaps i have bitten off more than i can chew - have you turned a goblet?

Sam18/08/2012 22:24:29
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386 forum posts
110 photos

Hi steve , what chisel are you using to turn the end grain , and what timber is it ? I personaly use a 1/2 " gouge to hit the worst of it out , and then finish using a 1" Scraper .

cheers sam

Derek Lane19/08/2012 15:47:06
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Steve I use a 3/8 bowl gouge for the inside then scrape it but for the outside. I use a 3/8"spindle gouge,1/4"spindle gouge and a skew chisel.

As for holding I always use a chuck with no problems how much have you inserted into the chuck. When making a goblet first turn the inside of the bowl then make a wooden inset and bring up the revolving centre to support before turning the rest working from the bowl part down to the foot.

Using this method i turned this goblet with no trouble and the stem is 2mm at its thinnest . Even though it is made from three pieces it was turned as a whole

Hope this helps

goblet

Edited By Derek Lane on 19/08/2012 15:48:19

Steve J W19/08/2012 20:43:45
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137 forum posts
9 photos

thanks for the advice, i think the problem is i might be sharpening the chisels wrong, i have tried to turn some very soft wood and also some laburnum, i think the problem is every time my chisel snags the inside (whish is often) it rips the wood and moves it inside the chuck, i think i need a turning buddy to show me the ropes lol or i might just give up.

sad sam19/08/2012 21:15:46
609 forum posts
251 photos

hi steve

what ever tool you are using keep the cutting part central with the piece you are cutting

it will help a lot to stop the snagging just raise the toolrest till your tool is central

Simon Reeves20/08/2012 13:18:17
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622 forum posts
227 photos

Hi Steve

A couple of questions...

What direction are you moving the gouge when you hollow out the bowl - centre to outside or outside to centre? Bearing in mind that you are cutting into end grain all the time, you can sometimes be more prone to catches if you work from the outside to the centre, as you would normally do with the side grain on a bowl. Also, if you try to hollow the bowl by treating it as side grain, i.e. by sweeping the gouge in an upwards curving arc towards the centre, you could get a catch.

Are you catching the gouge on the top edge or the bottom? If it's the top, then the problem is probably technique rather than sharpening (unless the gouge is REALLY blunt!). As Sam says, where is the cutting edge of the gouge? Hollowing from centre to outside and keeping the gouge central is safe, and try to keep the bevel rubbing. Either that, or use a different gouge. I think the type that cut the grain rather than scraping it away produce a better finish. HTH

Simon

Steve J W20/08/2012 18:21:02
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137 forum posts
9 photos

Thanks for the replies and good advice Simon and Sam, to tell the truth i am cutting both ways, i did manage today to take a few hours off work and have a play, i ended up with an ok goblet but this was only because i made it from a bit of softish wood that i could sand easy to get rid of the blemishes.

I think even though i dont think i have sharpened the tools right as you say its technique and alot of learning is needed.

do you think i should be using a finger nail gouge for the inside?

Steve J W20/08/2012 20:00:23
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137 forum posts
9 photos

here is my first one - it is better than it looks in the pic as the way i have taken the pic makes it look top heavy

 

 

. w1.jpg

Edited By Steve J W on 20/08/2012 20:03:15

Steve J W20/08/2012 20:06:12
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137 forum posts
9 photos

wow simon i have just looked at your pic album with your turnings in, brilliant.

Simon Reeves21/08/2012 12:52:59
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622 forum posts
227 photos

Thanks Steve. I'm only a beginner compared with some of the others on the site.

The goblet looks pretty good to me for a first effort. The curves are nice and smooth, which is always a good sign. Once you gain confidence and a bit more experience you should be able to turn thin walled versions like Derek.

Try using a piece of freshly cut timber and turning it wet. You'll be amazed at now thin the walls can go! Just as an experiment I made a failry clunky goblet years ago from a piece of an old bramley apple tree, with walls about 1mm thick. You need razor sharp tools and a bit of care, but it's good fun and very satisfying, especially when it warps out of shape as it dries!

Simon

Julian23/08/2012 21:22:35
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556 forum posts
28 photos

Hi Steve -- I think that most of the advice has already been said above, you need to work from the centre out and keep the handle of the gouge slightly above the cutting edge of the tool with the face at about the 10O'Clock position and keep the bevel rubbing as has been suggested. You will probably need to switch to a shear scraper for the sides or use the wings of a spindle gouge to bring up the sides. This should reduce the amount of sanding needed at the end, I think important also is to not ask too much of the tool in this I mean take light cuts and don't try to force the tool into the work.

This is my first goblet that was done a while ago now

goblet no1 - copy.jpg

Steve J W05/09/2012 19:18:47
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137 forum posts
9 photos

Thanks again for all the replys and the advice - its much appreciated.

Derek Lane07/09/2012 15:17:50
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3219 forum posts
1004 photos

Great job on the goblet Steve. Like the shape and the foot looks about the right size for the top

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