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Lets talk Workshop heating!

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paul wagstaffe16/12/2011 09:23:02
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107 forum posts
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What have you got and how do you rate it, I have nothing at the moment and its bloody cold in there.
 
Paul
Simon Reeves16/12/2011 13:05:22
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622 forum posts
227 photos
Three cheap oil filled electric radiators spread around the shop. They were about £15 each, but I'm sure you can get them cheaper. They seem to rarely be on, but the shop is quite well insulated and draftproof, which is probably just as important as the heating. Even when it was -1 or -2 outside recently the inside was a balmy 10 degrees!
 
Simon
Paul Bodiam16/12/2011 13:09:28
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108 forum posts
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My workshop is an a converted brick-built garage.
I have dry-lined the walls and fully insulated it (including in the ceiling void and below the floor), and built a half-height wall and fitted a large double-glazed window from a salvage yard in place of the original up-and-over door.
 
I use a small thermostatically controlled fan-heater (around £15 from Argos) mounted near the door and out of the way of any flying wood debris to heat the workshop when I'm in it. It doesn't take very long for the fan heater to get the workshop up to a comfortable working temperature.
 
When I'm not in the workshop, I turn the fan heater down to its "frost" setting to prevent glues and other finishes being damaged by a hard overnight frost.
 
I've also got a running water supply in the workshop which comes through from the unheated adjoining garage. I've protected it against freezing and possible burst pipes by running a thermostatically-controlled heating cable wrapped around the pipe inside the insulation. This switches itself on if the ambient temperature (in the unheated garage) falls below 3 degrees C.
 
cheers
Paul
daveO16/12/2011 16:17:32
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250 forum posts
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paul
I use a 2kw oil filled rad and its set through an independent thermastat and its switched on 24/7 at this time of the year and I feel there pretty cheap to run.
As paul said there is s need to protect the finishes etc, I lost all mine this time last year of which the replacement ost makes the running look even cheaper
dave
Mark Sutton16/12/2011 16:47:56
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193 forum posts
59 photos
Hi paul
 
I use an oil filled heater, which was relatively cheap when i bought it some time ago, also the workshop is lined and insulated throughout.
 
Mark

Edited By Mark Sutton on 16/12/2011 16:48:11

paul wagstaffe16/12/2011 16:55:25
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107 forum posts
11 photos
I am thinking of a wood burner so I can use my scraps as fuel.
 
Paul
Oddjob16/12/2011 19:57:35
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1635 forum posts
79 photos
Oil filled radiators, convector heaters, fan heaters, radiant heaters - no matter which you use they all use 1 kWh of electricity for every kw they are rated at. Therefore, if a 2kw heater runs 24/7 it can use up to 48kw at a cost in the region of £4 (dependant on your tariff). Some of these methods of heating are more efficient than others - i.e. are more effective in keeping you warm, but what really matters is the efficiency of your insulation and the setting of your thermostat.
 
A wood burner is the ideal solution for a workshop so long as your building is suitable and you have a good supply of wood. In my experience you will need one hell of a lot of scraps, especially of dry wood, to keep the burner going for long.
 
My solution? Keep out of the workshop when it is too cold! My workshop is a single skin cedar shed (16' x 10') with no insulation. So, temerature sensitive materials in an insulated cupboard with a 6/8 watt pygmy lamp inside and stay away until it gets warm enough or pay the price. (pygmy lamp costs less than 1.5p per day to run!

Richard
Derek Lane16/12/2011 23:54:19
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3219 forum posts
1004 photos
I have an insulated work shop and a electric heater set low just to keep the chill out of there, this helps prevent rust as well as makes it bearable to start work in. Once I start working and the machines there is extra heat from them as well
Les Hetherington17/12/2011 09:31:44
145 forum posts
53 photos
I have a small wood burner and a electric heater in my workshop, last christmas my friend and i were both turning in t shirts with the door open and mince pies on top of the burner.
This year i can't use the wood burner as i have a lot of green wood in my workshop to part turn so i have to use the electric heater just to take the chill out of the room.

 
sad sam17/12/2011 22:19:08
606 forum posts
242 photos
hi all
i guess im breaking all the rules i have a gas mobile heater i have been using the gas bottle from my barbicue as well as the one with the fire last year i thought the bottles were empty and priced a replacement i was surprised to find they were £30 pounds each to exchange for a full one so i thought i will find a cheaper way to heat
i found out they were not empty they were propane and had frozen so was lucky i had not
changed them but they are empty now
so i am going to put a central heating radiator in my workshop next year if possible it should not cost anymore to run an extra radiator or so im told
sadsam

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