By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more

Bowl Advice

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
paul johnson 215/03/2011 21:08:14
avatar
197 forum posts
100 photos
Took a weeks holiday to do some work in the garden, but due to the rain today work on stop gave me the time in the shed to turn a bowl for one of the lads in work with the blank I prepared last week. Its only the third bowl ive done and the biggest i can turn on my lathe 91/4'' dia, I turned the outside with good results reversed it to turn the inside I was faced with a few problems (1) I could not curve the inside towards the rim as the handle of my gouge was catching the bed of the lathe (2) as i was cutting towards the rim on the inside i could not good finish on the end grain i tried very fine cuts and sanding but i couldnt get it right. I hope you can make sense of what i am trying to say all your advice and tips would be most welcomed thanks.
Paul



BillW15/03/2011 21:25:33
avatar
711 forum posts
21 photos
I can't offer you any advice Paul because I've not done any bowl turning yet but I am looking forward to the advice given for use later.
 
Beautiful wood and i think you have done very well.
 
Bill.
paul johnson 215/03/2011 21:49:53
avatar
197 forum posts
100 photos
thanks Bill as i said its only the third bowl for me and im happy with the way it went its just the finish didnt turn out the way i would of liked. so yes im looking forward to all the advice i recive. PS im starting to get the feel of the bowl gouge now
 
Paul
Derek Lane15/03/2011 22:34:13
avatar
Moderator
3219 forum posts
1004 photos
Paul try always to cut downhill when doing bowls in this case from rim to the centre for the inside.
Also try and keep the bevel rubbing so as to take the lightest of cuts and keep the tool as sharp as possible.
Something else that might help tear out is to coat the inside with sander sealer before doing the final cuts
dennis wake15/03/2011 23:12:10
avatar
2044 forum posts
1451 photos
1 articles
hi Paul and Bill
before i answer your question
when turning bowls try and get the bowl to flow in shape. when you first start turning bowls you will come up with a lot of different problems from timber type, hidden checks ( splits ), direction changes different to spindle work.
the way i do bowls is by as you have done turn and finish the out side with a nice flow that will sit in your hand and look good. then when turning the inside i try to get the rim or out side edge done first so as when you get the wall thickness thinner and thinner you still have the stability in the bowl to stop vibration as you have not took the center out as yet. this is then don when you are happy with the rim. you have got to remember that you have two lots of end grain to deal with. and last but not least sand starting with the grade you need to get the finish you need and work through the grades not missing any grades as they cut out the scratches that the grade before has put in. i start at times with 60 grit working up to 600 grit.
if i get a chance over the next few days i will do a how to on the method i am on about but in the meantime have a look at this thread by Ralph >>hear<<
 
have fun and enjoy
dennis
 Paul sorry i forgot to say that for only your 3rd bowl you have done realy well. what wood is it.  do your next bowl and give it to your better half and in a year you can look at it and compair that to the ones you are doing then and then you can replace it with the one you have done as you can see how you are coming on in ability.

Edited By dennis wake on 15/03/2011 23:19:21

BillW16/03/2011 11:29:01
avatar
711 forum posts
21 photos
Thank you Derek and Dennis, all entered into memory, if I can remember how to recall it later.
 
Bill.
Ralph Harvey16/03/2011 12:37:16
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles
Paul
 
1st its a very nice bowl for the third one turned,
 
What tools are you using, you say you are getting used to the bowl gouge, the main points to remember are, keep a good sharp edge, start the cut with the bevel rubbing and lift the handle untill a light cut is made lift it further to take a heavier cut, but light for the last cut also try to take the last cut in one from the outside edge towards the centre.
 
With all tools the position of your toolrest is important, keep it arouind 1/4 " from the timber and keep a firm grip on the tool dont let it bounce arround on the toolrest
 
Removal of waste timber can be done with a drawer cut from centre out but this you say you are having a problem with, what lathe are you using, my little Axminster is a short bed and i often find the toolrest gets in the way, just remove it ? put it back after, this will give you better access anyway.
 
What other tools do you use ? do you use a scraper, a decent sharp scraper, set at the right angle will remove timber without leaving any torn grain, just make sure you use it on a down angle play around on some scrap timber and find what works for you.
 
Dont be afraid to use abrasive to remove bad tool marks, everyone dose it, start with 80 or 120 grit, and work your way down to a finer grit like 320 or more if you like, the trick is to start with a smoother grit as you get better at it, with better tooling 180 grit could be a good starting point..
 
Ralph
paul johnson 216/03/2011 18:50:57
avatar
197 forum posts
100 photos
May i start by saying thankyou to all your comments, the gouge i was using was a 31/8 when i used it for the first time i was frightened of it but as time went on i was feeling more relaxed with it, the lathe i got is a cheap clarke 20'' between centres but it suited the budget at the time. I was using pull cuts from centre to rim i can see what Derek is saying push cut from rim to centre. Ralph i havent got a scraper as yet but its on the to buy list. I seemed to be doing a lot of what you guy's are saying i just need to fine tune things a bit i will put all your advice into practice. Dennis the wood i used was a light oak and i look forward to a tutorial on it im going to read Ralph's now.
 
Thanks Paul.  PS just read ralphs thread on bowl turning thanks Ralps.
 
 

Edited By paul johnson 2 on 16/03/2011 18:53:59

Simon Reeves17/03/2011 13:08:05
avatar
622 forum posts
227 photos
Hi Paul - a very good effort for only the third bowl, especially as it's oak,which I've found is not the most forgiving of timbers. You certainly need to keep the gouge sharp, otherwise you'll end up tearing the grain rather than cutting it.
 
A 3/8 gouge is a good general purpose one, but you can often get a better finish using a smaller one, and it sometimes pays to make a small secondary bevel at the base of the main bevel. For access to the base of a deeper bowl, whilst still keeping the bevel rubbing you'll likely need a gouge with a much steeper angle, but all in good time! Scrapers are good for this too, but again, they need to be razor sharp otherwise all you'll produce is dust. How do you sharpen the gouges?
 
A good tip when you are just starting, and to get a feel for how the gouges cut, is to practice each cut as if it were the final one, and to try to make each cut something near the final shape of the bowl if you can, rather than just removing material.
 
Ralph's bowls and other turnings are quite an inspiration I think.
 
Simon
BillW18/03/2011 15:56:21
avatar
711 forum posts
21 photos
Thanks' Ralph and Simon, I've been watching this thread with great interest.
Had a bash at a bowl the other night, soon got into turning the outside but decided my fingernail gouge that came with the pen kit I bought was to short for the inside so will be buying one (or two) in the near future.
 
Bill.
Ralph Harvey18/03/2011 16:36:29
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles
Bill
 
If you are looking for a good quality Bowl gouge, the deep fluted 3/8 from Ashley Iles is the one i go for, it costs more than the others but it lasts longer too. and buy unhandled tools it will save you a few quid, after all we are woodturners so why pay someone else to turn your handle ?
 
Ralph
paul johnson 218/03/2011 16:38:24
avatar
197 forum posts
100 photos
Hi Simon I will be taking all onboard what you gents have been giving me, I got only 1 bowl gouge which 31/8 and i sharpen it on 6'' grinder with a white stone with a homemade jig i copied off you tube and sharpen it to a 30degree angle which seems to do the trick for me.
 
Thanks Paul.
BillW18/03/2011 18:22:30
avatar
711 forum posts
21 photos
Ralph, I think Paul and I can take this as a compliment "after all we are woodturners".
I still consider myself an apprentice.
I have just been searching for Ashley Iles, they don't seam to sell turning chisels without handles, in fact I only found one UK retailer.
 
Bill.
Ron Davis18/03/2011 19:28:28
avatar
1619 forum posts
201 photos
Bill, i boughta gouge from them at Ally Pally with out a handle, the have racks full of them, try contacting them direct
 
Ron
BillW18/03/2011 19:38:04
avatar
711 forum posts
21 photos
Thanks Ron,
I have just found a retailer that sells them without handles.
I'll also contact them.
 
Bill.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of The Woodworker & Good Woodworking? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find The Woodworker & Good Woodworking 

Support Our Partners
Craft Supplies
Robert Sorby
Transwave 2017
Felder UK April 2016
Triton
Wood Workers Workshop
Marriott & Co
Peter Sefton IMPROVE FAST LONG
D&M Tools
Turners Tool Box
Tormek
Chippendale
D B Keighley
Subscription Offers

Subscribe to<br />    The Woodworker Magazine and receive a FREE gift

Contact Us

We're always happy to hear from you, so feel free to get in touch!

Click here to find who to contact