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Quirk bead

My next project

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Andy King31/10/2008 10:07:00
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170 forum posts
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19 articles
Hi Malc, Looking at your sketch, there aren't any router cutters that I have seen that will replicate that mould - it's impossible in a single pass, but there are ones that will do a similar one in two passes, but without the chamfer, you end up with a square quirk shoulder. To get this mould, I think the only way is with a scratch stock and a couple of suitable profiled cutters, one registering from the top edge, the other from the front face. This cutter here from Trend shows the bead a router will cut (look at the corner bead cutter) http://www.trend-uk.com/en/UK/productsubgroup1/49/Bead%20&%20Reed.html hope this helps. Andy
Andy King31/10/2008 13:18:00
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170 forum posts
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19 articles

Looking at your sketch again Malc, I think even with a scratch stock you won't get the undercut of the bead, the scratching action won't allow it, you'll end up with a semi circle, although a further profile could be used to introduce the final undercut as it doesn't have to remove too much timber once the bead is established.

A lot of work though!

 Andy

Mike Garnham31/10/2008 13:44:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Goodness me Malc, this is one scores highly in the "degree of difficulty" stakes!! It is do-able, though, with a single cutter...........

However, you would need to make a 45 degree sledge, and do the work in 2 passes...........then still have to deal with a junction of the 2 cuts right in the middle of the corner beading where it is most visible.

Do you really want to go to this trouble? If so, I'll do a sketch this evening to show what I have in mind..........otherwise, have a look through the various cataloues for another profile!!

Mike

Big Al31/10/2008 18:22:00
1599 forum posts
73 photos
Malc, looking at your sketch, the only way that I can think of is to cut the angle first, using a core box cutter and machine a round bottomed groove in the bevel, and then attach some doweling, either purchased or made by yourself. Al
Malc31/10/2008 20:16:00
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411 forum posts
63 photos

Perhaps I'll think of something else.

I'm reminded of the engineering joke of a piece that cant be turned, milled, forged or cast.

Thanks guys for taking the trouble to give this some thought and thanks for not laughing.

What about a nice roundover?

Malc.

Doug31/10/2008 23:09:00
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3415 forum posts
35 photos

Malc,

I used to work for a kitchen manufacturer who produced the same profile as your drawing, they called it a cock bead, & used it on their front frame furniture.

2 Passes with a round veining bit & 1 with a 1/4 flat bit in a router table would produce what you`ve drawn.

Baz

Malc02/11/2008 16:09:00
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411 forum posts
63 photos

Thanks Baz

Sadly I do not have a router tabe at present. I've decided to try a simpler moulding this time around.

Malc.

Malc07/11/2008 16:21:00
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411 forum posts
63 photos

This is the moulding that I ended up using, it's simply a roundover with quirk. I think I've got the terminology right now.

http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/5313/DSCF0098.JPG

Next picture is the plinth fitted.

http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/5313/DSCF0099.JPG

I have so much trouble with the 4" wide mitres on the front corners. None of my tools seem to be able to do it lol. Any hints and tips would be most appreciated.

Only have the top and back to finish it.

Malc.

Malc09/11/2008 15:08:00
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411 forum posts
63 photos

http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/5313/DSCF0115.JPG

http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/5313/DSCF0116.JPG

Well I've finished the bookcase. It's a great improvement on the veneered chipboard one it replaces. I did make a lot of mistakes as I went but managed to get round most things. I'm a bit disappointed with the various tones of the pine but I was not planning to use clear varnish at the outset (SWMBO choice). A few more pieces and I am going to try something in hardwood.

Malc.

Mike Garnham09/11/2008 16:20:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Good for you, Malc!

Pine is a great timber to do your early work with............and is tricky enough to work with that when you start using hardwoods you will generally find them straight-forward. You should have talked your wife out of the clear varnish.........that apart, this is a nice looking bookscase. With bigger bookshelves I would have the shelf spacing greater at the bottom of the piece, and closer at the top (it helps the proportions), but thats not important for something this size.

I notice that you have sensibly cut-out to allow for your skirting. You then appear to have set the backing forward to the line of the front of the cut-out. This is fine, but the extra inch or so of shelf-width can sometimes be useful, so I tend to try and make the underside of the bottom shelf sit just above skirting height, then the backing can be set that bit further back.

Don't worry about the colour!! Take another photo is 6 months time and you will amazed at the change.....it will all mellow (yellow) to approx. the same colour.

Anyway, well done.....keep 'em coming!!

Mike

Malc09/11/2008 20:38:00
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411 forum posts
63 photos

Mike,

Thanks for your comments. You spotted one of my mistakes. My intention was to do just as you suggested with shelves going further back but ripped them to the wrong width, one of those Oh s**t moments. I also brought the bottom housing on one side right out through the front but managed to patch it up and it's now virtually invisible.

The greatest difficulty for me was the mitres on the plinth fortunately the short sides splayed outwards so I was able to plane some wood from each side and bring them back somewhere near square. I need to make some kind of shooting board I think but dont know how to tackle it.

Regards,

Malc.

Doug09/11/2008 21:04:00
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3415 forum posts
35 photos

Malc,

Looks a nice piece, well done.

Those mistakes are all good experience, they might not seem it at the time, but you never stop learning.

As for shooting boards, they have been disscussed a few times in the past, so a search on the "search forum" facility above should bring up some answers.

Cheers.

Baz.

Mike Garnham09/11/2008 21:33:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Malc,

the first lesson of mitres like those is to leave the piece over-long, then adjust, then cut to length once you are happy with the joint.........or chuck it away and start with a new piece of wood!

Old hands here will not be surprised when I say that I would adjust mitres like this with the belt sander. I would really prefer to do it on my old dad's 20+inch disc sander, but one of my brothers got that ahead of me!!!

I don't have  a shooting board, but it is the same principal: cut it as close as you can, then adjust..........only this time with a plane on its side. 

Mike

Oddjob10/11/2008 09:42:00
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1635 forum posts
79 photos

Malc

That looks great.

Just type shooting board into Google and you'll get all the help you need to make shooting boards.

Richard

Malc10/11/2008 18:35:00
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411 forum posts
63 photos

Thanks for the advice and encouragement.

Onwards and upwards.

Malc. 

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