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Grain tear

Filling Grain tear in Sapele

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David Nevin29/06/2010 10:34:52
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57 forum posts
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I am Making a trophy cabinet for my golf club using sapele...when planing I did not take enough care and have grain tearing can anybody reccomend a grain filler  that will give me a good finish please or any other method to remove the problem
Thanks
Sparky29/06/2010 16:09:29
7631 forum posts
22 photos
Hi David and welcome to this site's forum
 
I'm sure your have your answers in due time when the more experienced come on.
 
In the meantime, I know this sounds stupid but, is your blade sharp?
 
This can be a big cause of tearing out..........
 
Good luck and thanks for filling in your profile......you just need to upload your projects in your album now
 
Cheers
 
Marc
Big Al29/06/2010 17:29:13
1604 forum posts
73 photos
Marc, it can be very easy to get grain tear on sapele.
 
Sapele has interlocking grain, which basically means that the grain runs both ways, usually on its edge and can be described as "stripy", and so if you try to take too heavy a cut, or if your plane needs sharpening then you will tear the grain.
 
Machine planing virtually eliminates grain tear as long as you use a power feed.
 
I personally have never got on with grain fillers, and so cant recommend any. If I had this problem I would either use a cabinet scraper and random orbit sander to work out the tear, or if it was really bad, replace the part and start again.
 
Al 
Sparky29/06/2010 17:51:11
7631 forum posts
22 photos
Thanks for that Al.
 
Not used Sapele before so I'll remember those tips.
 
Marc
Big Al29/06/2010 18:16:01
1604 forum posts
73 photos
I like sapele, it's what I used for my greenhouse. It is fairly dense wood, and is great for external projects.
 
I dont think that I would make a piece of furniture from it though, well not for myself, that is.
 
Al 
David Nevin30/06/2010 11:15:33
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57 forum posts
26 photos
many thaks for the replies
I used a dewalt planner thicknesser and blades where sharp
what I think may have caused the tears was trying to take to big  a cut as I used  rogh planned sapele  but will allways check blade sharpness from noe on
Sapele as a wood for thr trophy cabinet looks really good when sanded and waxed
I have noticed sapele can have  some old woodworm hole in the wood I have been told this is quite prevelent
will post a photo when finished  but thanks for the advise
regards
david nevin


David Nevin30/06/2010 11:16:54
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57 forum posts
26 photos
re my last reply  must get spell check....not good at spelling allways had a secretary who did most of the work
David
Sparky30/06/2010 14:20:42
7631 forum posts
22 photos
David
 
We chat about wood and what can be done with it, not spelling.........if it wasn't for Google's spell checker, I'd be lost!
 

Big Al30/06/2010 17:44:55
1604 forum posts
73 photos
I use safari, it has a spell checker built in, and although I am usually good with spelling, I am not that good, and so without safari I would struggle.
 
Al 
Matthew Platt01/07/2010 01:56:52
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347 forum posts
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A good smoothing plane with a back bevelled iron or a cabinet scraper will fix tearout as long as you haven't machined the components right down to finished dimension. Unlike sanding they also leave a cleanly cut surface that allows light to penetrate the finished surface and refract. The gold and red colours in sapele are particularly beautiful if finished in this way. 
 
 

Edited By Matthew Platt on 01/07/2010 01:59:48

David Nevin01/07/2010 18:40:03
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57 forum posts
26 photos
Andrew..many thanks for the info looking at your album the shelf made out of sapele
what finish did you use   ..brush on wax ? I would be interested for my trophy cabinet
David
Matthew Platt02/07/2010 00:04:18
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347 forum posts
9 photos
Hi David,
 
It's pumice powder and tung oil to fill the pores, then several coats of shellac to seal the oil, rubbed down in between to provide a perfectly flat base for the varnish. The varnish was Italian marine varnish - the stuff they use on godolas - laid on with a foam brush (don't squeeze out the excess, just give it time to drip off the corner or you'll get bubbles).  Then a light coat of beeswax and natural turpentine to bring out the shine.
 
I did multiple coats of shellac and varish as it was going into a bathroom but for a trophy cabinet you could get away with a couple.
 
Cheers,
 
Matthew

Edited By Matthew Platt on 02/07/2010 00:05:55

Sparky02/07/2010 15:34:34
7631 forum posts
22 photos
Beautiful outcome Matthew, love the colour of the wood.
David Nevin17/08/2010 17:11:44
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57 forum posts
26 photos
The Trophy cabinet is now finished and I would like to post some photo's
Question is how do I do it 
David
Sparky17/08/2010 17:20:49
7631 forum posts
22 photos
Hi David
 
If you follow this link ►► here ◄◄  and choose >> How to make an album <<  you should be up and running in no time
 
Looking forward to seeing the cabinet.
 
Marc
 

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