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Which disc sander?

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Woody Al16/10/2008 21:27:00
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98 forum posts

Evening all. I'm looking to purchase a disc sander, can anyone recommend a good quality unit that won't break the bank? I would consider buying second hand too but not sure which models to look out for.

I would be grateful for any advice.

Richard Hawkins20/10/2008 23:52:00
avatar
78 forum posts
29 photos

Hi Albert,

I can't recomend any because I made mine! But I can certainly recomend doing that. If you have a lathe, cut an MDF disc using your faceplate to the largest size of disc size you can. They are usually sold as 6", 8", 10" and 12" I'm lucky that my lathe allowed the biggest 12". I then made a box out of mdf that clamps to the lathe bed. The top of the box is midway up the disc. Now you can be clever and put a sacrificial lid on so theat you can have different ones with different jigs and fences on. As well as that the catalogues tell you the speeds that the disc sanders run at so you can easily set you lathe to a standard speed.

I have just posted about the sand flee on here, which is the next sander I want to build and will attack that tomorrow.

Here's a picture of my set up. (A handy tip, I bought the self adhesive disc thinking I could pop it on and it would be fine, but the self adhesive doesn't work well on MDF so I ended up using contact adhesive!! One site I read said that he has two discs, each with a different grit on each side. I haven't done that as I have done so little actual disc sanding. I built it because I needed it to shape parts on the garden bench I made.)

http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/9175/disc_sander.jpg




Richard

Doug21/10/2008 07:24:00
avatar
3415 forum posts
35 photos

Albert,

I can`t see Richards photo, not sure why, so have added mine from my gallery.

http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/5556/CIMG3175.JPG

Is this the sort of thing you are looking for, or is it the hand held random orbital type you are after? If so i would highly recommend the DeWalt ROS.

Baz.

Richard Hawkins21/10/2008 08:21:00
avatar
78 forum posts
29 photos
http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/9175/disc_sander_0.jpg



Hi Baz and Albert,

Sorry I uploaded the photo to here and it put it into the wrong gallery. I delelted it from that gallery and put it into the one I wanted it in! I'll try again! I just assumed you meant this type of disc sander rather than the random obital type!!

The other thing for me is that not only is money not so plentiful but neither is space! So the more jigs I can build that use what I have the better. I haven't got anymore surface to take dedicated machines.

Richard

Woody Al22/10/2008 18:42:00
avatar
98 forum posts

Hi Richard and Baz,

You have the right idea. It is the bench top type disc sander that I'm after. I had not thought about making my own. That is a good idea but I don't have a lathe.

I have been looking at a machine mart model and a record power model that incorporates a belt sander. Any other recommendations?

Al

Big Al22/10/2008 19:27:00
1593 forum posts
73 photos
Albert, I bought a perform (axminster cheap label) 12" disc sander about 3 years ago which has served me well. The sander that i bought is similar to all of the 12" disc sanders available around the 110 mark, and basically you make your choice based on your own preferences as I believe they are all made in the same factory in china. Al
Richard Hawkins22/10/2008 23:28:00
avatar
78 forum posts
29 photos

Hi again Albert,

I don't really know what kind of work you are doing, but my advice is two fold and is how I tend to buy tools. If you're not sure whether you really need a certain tool, buy a cheap one, then if you decide you really need it and can't live without it, invest in a good one, you haven't wasted too much money finding out, especially if you never use the thing. If, on the other hand you know you can't live without it, get the biggest you can afford, because a tool that isn't big enough is like paying for a tool and still not having it.

I have bought most of my tools on this principle. I have some cheap tools that I have hardly used but thought I needed, sitting in drawers. And I have ugrade some tools where I have used the cheap tools to death, or modified and still can't get the performance I want, or simply that the cheap tools weren't up to what I need. Actually I can't think of a single tool in my shop where I bought a decent one straight off. I have only found out what I can't live without by buying one and seeing whether I use it!! Just thought of something, my biscuit jointer, I bought a decent one of them straight off. I read a review in Good Woodworking (Do I get something for the plug!) and it said the fence on the one I was going to buy wasn't much good. Knowing how many fences I have replaced on tools with shop made ones I thought I'd better buy one it recomends as having a good fence. I couldn't imagine how I would make an MDF fence for a biscuit jointer!! Mind you I wish I had a festool morticing biscuiting thing!

Buying the biggest isn't necessarily buying the most expensive as Big Al says, a 12" perform sander is probably the same cost as a Shepach 6 inch disc 4 inch belt sander.  If you think you want a belt sander as well then you need to consider that. You wont want to buy a disc sander and then a belt and disc sander, (probably!) You may get away later with a portable belt sander. I still haven't got one. I couldn't make up my mind for years, until I really needed one and built it.

As a very budget option I have just remembered that axminster do a drill powered lathe for about £30. I started with one of those as a lathe. But I think that comes with a face plate and a small table for using it as a sander. http://www.axminster.co.uk/product-Axminster-Drill-Powered-Woodturning-Lathe-21279.htm

That probably sounds like a lot of waffle, but I never came to the answer for myself on which sander to buy!! But I hope there is something useful in there somwhere!

Richard 

Woody Al16/10/2008 21:27:00
avatar
98 forum posts

Evening all. I'm looking to purchase a disc sander, can anyone recommend a good quality unit that won't break the bank? I would consider buying second hand too but not sure which models to look out for.

I would be grateful for any advice.

Richard Hawkins20/10/2008 23:52:00
avatar
78 forum posts
29 photos

Hi Albert,

I can't recomend any because I made mine! But I can certainly recomend doing that. If you have a lathe, cut an MDF disc using your faceplate to the largest size of disc size you can. They are usually sold as 6", 8", 10" and 12" I'm lucky that my lathe allowed the biggest 12". I then made a box out of mdf that clamps to the lathe bed. The top of the box is midway up the disc. Now you can be clever and put a sacrificial lid on so theat you can have different ones with different jigs and fences on. As well as that the catalogues tell you the speeds that the disc sanders run at so you can easily set you lathe to a standard speed.

I have just posted about the sand flee on here, which is the next sander I want to build and will attack that tomorrow.

Here's a picture of my set up. (A handy tip, I bought the self adhesive disc thinking I could pop it on and it would be fine, but the self adhesive doesn't work well on MDF so I ended up using contact adhesive!! One site I read said that he has two discs, each with a different grit on each side. I haven't done that as I have done so little actual disc sanding. I built it because I needed it to shape parts on the garden bench I made.)

http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/9175/disc_sander.jpg




Richard

Doug21/10/2008 07:24:00
avatar
3415 forum posts
35 photos

Albert,

I can`t see Richards photo, not sure why, so have added mine from my gallery.

http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/5556/CIMG3175.JPG

Is this the sort of thing you are looking for, or is it the hand held random orbital type you are after? If so i would highly recommend the DeWalt ROS.

Baz.

Richard Hawkins21/10/2008 08:21:00
avatar
78 forum posts
29 photos
http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/9175/disc_sander_0.jpg



Hi Baz and Albert,

Sorry I uploaded the photo to here and it put it into the wrong gallery. I delelted it from that gallery and put it into the one I wanted it in! I'll try again! I just assumed you meant this type of disc sander rather than the random obital type!!

The other thing for me is that not only is money not so plentiful but neither is space! So the more jigs I can build that use what I have the better. I haven't got anymore surface to take dedicated machines.

Richard

Woody Al22/10/2008 18:42:00
avatar
98 forum posts

Hi Richard and Baz,

You have the right idea. It is the bench top type disc sander that I'm after. I had not thought about making my own. That is a good idea but I don't have a lathe.

I have been looking at a machine mart model and a record power model that incorporates a belt sander. Any other recommendations?

Al

Big Al22/10/2008 19:27:00
1593 forum posts
73 photos
Albert, I bought a perform (axminster cheap label) 12" disc sander about 3 years ago which has served me well. The sander that i bought is similar to all of the 12" disc sanders available around the 110 mark, and basically you make your choice based on your own preferences as I believe they are all made in the same factory in china. Al
Richard Hawkins22/10/2008 23:28:00
avatar
78 forum posts
29 photos

Hi again Albert,

I don't really know what kind of work you are doing, but my advice is two fold and is how I tend to buy tools. If you're not sure whether you really need a certain tool, buy a cheap one, then if you decide you really need it and can't live without it, invest in a good one, you haven't wasted too much money finding out, especially if you never use the thing. If, on the other hand you know you can't live without it, get the biggest you can afford, because a tool that isn't big enough is like paying for a tool and still not having it.

I have bought most of my tools on this principle. I have some cheap tools that I have hardly used but thought I needed, sitting in drawers. And I have ugrade some tools where I have used the cheap tools to death, or modified and still can't get the performance I want, or simply that the cheap tools weren't up to what I need. Actually I can't think of a single tool in my shop where I bought a decent one straight off. I have only found out what I can't live without by buying one and seeing whether I use it!! Just thought of something, my biscuit jointer, I bought a decent one of them straight off. I read a review in Good Woodworking (Do I get something for the plug!) and it said the fence on the one I was going to buy wasn't much good. Knowing how many fences I have replaced on tools with shop made ones I thought I'd better buy one it recomends as having a good fence. I couldn't imagine how I would make an MDF fence for a biscuit jointer!! Mind you I wish I had a festool morticing biscuiting thing!

Buying the biggest isn't necessarily buying the most expensive as Big Al says, a 12" perform sander is probably the same cost as a Shepach 6 inch disc 4 inch belt sander.  If you think you want a belt sander as well then you need to consider that. You wont want to buy a disc sander and then a belt and disc sander, (probably!) You may get away later with a portable belt sander. I still haven't got one. I couldn't make up my mind for years, until I really needed one and built it.

As a very budget option I have just remembered that axminster do a drill powered lathe for about £30. I started with one of those as a lathe. But I think that comes with a face plate and a small table for using it as a sander. http://www.axminster.co.uk/product-Axminster-Drill-Powered-Woodturning-Lathe-21279.htm

That probably sounds like a lot of waffle, but I never came to the answer for myself on which sander to buy!! But I hope there is something useful in there somwhere!

Richard 

Nancy Brown 123/01/2018 12:20:39
avatar
14 forum posts

I would like to request you to buy Makita 3710 disc sander. The sander is a powerful device used to smooth surfaces from scratch with sandpaper. This sander gives you smoother finishes and can operate at 11,000 RPM which is another factor we suggest you look at in this Makita 3710 review. The BO3710 is usually a good sander along with its stunning price. It is powerful, noiseless, low vibrations and the dust collection is better than other sanders on the market. I think it helps you.

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