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Sparky09/09/2008 16:20:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos

Vaughn

Would be interested in how you did the restoring..........what methods and liquids (if any) did you used to de-rust it all?

Good job done though

Cheers

Marc

Vaughn09/09/2008 19:39:00
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92 forum posts
34 photos

Hi Marc

Thanks very much! i wish i still had the pre-restoration photo. my pc was stolen, and still looking thru backups to see if i have it.

all i did was work through the various grits, from 60 to 800. i then used a buffing wheel with fine paste(pink in color, can't remember what grit). i did use a bit of lubricating oil, which i normally use with oilstones when i sharpen knives. thats it really. after all that the rust was gone, but some pitting remains. when i started you could barely read the markings. 

i reckon the oil, and the resulting slurry, does a good job of removing and sealing.

regards

vaughn

Sparky10/09/2008 20:47:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos

Hi Vaughn

I did an independent review of a rust remover which is basically water. Only needed a small wire brush and an old tooth brush to get into the niggly areas.

Heres a link to it. >>> here <<<

Its amazing stuff and certainly cleaned up my tools and it seals the metal afterwards.......

Youve got an wonderful gallery building up too, well done.

Marc

George Arnold10/09/2008 21:29:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

 Sparky

I looked at a draw knife in a second hand shop last week they wanted £25 for it I thought that was a bit steep so it's still in the shop.

George

Sparky10/09/2008 21:40:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos

I had been given my great granddads and I've used it to remove the bark of logs, still is a thing of beauty

Marc

Mike Garnham10/09/2008 22:10:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Did you know that the drawknife is the major tool used in the manufacture of cricket bats? I reckon the old boys who do that could carve one of your frogs, Marc, with their drawknife. They are great to watch!!

Mike

Sparky10/09/2008 22:31:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos

I've watched one do exactly that Mike..........make cricket bats that is ......also watched a cooper make a barrel.........fascinating.

I had to make a 14' oar in my old boat building days and I used my draw knife for that while the others used planes and spokeshaves..........I had to use a spokeshave for the paddle but did the pole with no problems.........

 Marc

Mike Garnham10/09/2008 22:59:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

They are so versatile...........hacking off large chunks one minute, planing the finest shavings off the next.

I've never seen a cooper at work, but you can just imagine it.............big leather apron, stave against the belly, drawknife in hand and a great pile of shavings all round. The work was probably untouched by pencil, too.

A 14 foot oar........what was that for? A trireme??!!

Sparky10/09/2008 23:05:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos

LOL, Not far off...........we were next door to a rowing club and they buy the oars (if there good enough) each year from the trainees.....I think they sold them on too

Marc

Mike Riley10/09/2008 23:07:00
337 forum posts
5 photos
5 articles
I just used a drawknife (spokeshvave and rasp) to make a quick 'n dirty carving mallet from a piece of ash off the firewood pile. I used to use it for shaped "rips" if you follow me, before I got the bandsaw, now it's invaluable any time anything square needs to become round.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3065/2846168201_9b2ea96752.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3288/2846171385_c8cc8fe04a.jpg

Cheers Mike
Mike Garnham10/09/2008 23:15:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Mike,

having just chucked my dead mallet, and having quite a number of ash off-cuts, I was thinking of making one from the other. Would you say that ash was a suitable wood for a decent mallet?

Mike

ps.....You've got a bit more work to do on that handle before it becomes a magazine project!

pps........I've always assumed that a drawknife was used to make laths (for plastering over). Does anyone know if I'm right? (I suppose a simple hatchet would probably do the job.......).

Sparky10/09/2008 23:19:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos
I dont know Mike...........would be find for the woodland mag!
Mike Riley10/09/2008 23:23:00
337 forum posts
5 photos
5 articles
Yup that handle is as rough as rough can be, but all I wanted was something to hit the gouges with No lathe so ... So far the mallet has been in service for most of today and this evening and shows no signs of use at all. Not that it's a pretty thing to start with but the ash seems to have stood up to the bashing fine. It's not too heavy that you can't swing it for a sustained period of time but heavy enough to do the job. Edit Re Laths traditionally they would be riven I believe so I would have thought a froe and large mallet, or handled log (like my mallet but bigger). would have been the tools of choice. Being riven they would split along the grain which should make them stronger (theoretically, on a good day, with the wind in the right direction). Cheers Mike
Vaughn11/09/2008 11:23:00
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92 forum posts
34 photos

Hi Marc

Thanks for the link, i read it and will use it for future reference. who makes the "restore" product? i don't think i've seen it in south africa.

if i can get it there are quite a few tools i have not bought that will be added promptly.

i live in an area where there are many antique/vintage stores, but some of the stuff seems virtually unsaveable. reckon i'll look more carefully in future.

regards

vaughn

George Arnold11/09/2008 11:59:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

 South Africa thats a long way of Vaughn.

Have any of you looked in the Axminster  catalogue there are several draw knives in there one of them has a flexible blade. The English pattern is £35-98 so perhaps £25 was not to dear,

George

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