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The latest Good Woodworking (205)

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Ralph Harvey24/08/2008 13:06:00
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles

Well as no one has started a thread yet i will... credit where its due !!

I am impressed, the changes are good, i am particularly impressed that the advert for this site is now relevent to the site, with an update on what actually happened, there is the humerous comments on the "debate" over this sites previous column but the changes have happened so fair play.   will have no doubt it will all encourage more new members to give us a try. 

The article on the 240mph wooden supercar is a good read, whilst "The Challlenge cup" is an interesting project, particularly relevent at the moment with some members including myself trying out segmented work, although to split it into two episodes is a little disapointing,

I am also pleased to see the hand v machine article on morticing is now linked together and not over to separate sections,

Dont get me wrong i am not going to rush out and get the subscription but I will be buying it again to see if the changes stick or even get better

Ralph

Olly Parry-Jones24/08/2008 15:52:00
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2776 forum posts
636 photos

...And I was just about to start this thread myself, Ralph!

I think this is probably the best issue I've seen since Magicalia took over. Then again, you could say I'm partially "biased" towards this issue as a couple of the features are focused not too far from home! Forming a 'co-operative' in one large workshop is something that has been briefly mentioned at college between us, funnily enough. The guys featured in the article aren't far from college, so we may have to pay them a visit, perhaps...

Good to see Ben on board with the photography as well as the article on Ronnie Roberts, you've clearly got a great eye - are we likely to see your work appearing in Good Wood more regularly? Is this all to do with the "freedom" you now have in your new role?

I can't find much to critisise this issue, which is certainly a good thing. This site does indeed get a better mention this time but it remains to be seen what effect that'll have on the regulars here in the long term.

Keep it up guys, I'm beginning to see how this mag will be different to The Woodworker!

Oddjob25/08/2008 14:09:00
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1635 forum posts
79 photos

I'm away from home at present but did manage a quick scan before I left last Monday when GW arrived in the post.

My swift glance didn't impress me very much and I suspect that the improvements others have 'noticed' are coincidental.  I feel sure that content for this issue was prepared long before the critisisms of the last few issues.

I did note that supposedly instructional articles have nowhere near enough detail for an amateur to make the item concerned.  I also noted the presence of a high proportion of 'Sunday Supplement' type articles.  Good general journalism shaded towards woodworking but by no means as woodworking specific as I expect the magazine to be.

I may add to this when I read the mag thoroughly later in the week.

Richard

Woodworker25/08/2008 15:44:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Cheers Olly, you've hit the nail on the head there (pun intended). I'll be out and about with camera and GWW notepad in hand over the coming weeks. I think we're getting to a point now where GWW and WW work together really quite well. It's something we intend to build on because the two magazines have complimentary strengths and this site is the glue the bonds them (pun intended!).
Ralph Harvey25/08/2008 20:39:00
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles

Ben

I hope they are not intending to get too closely together, only even with the changes WW is still the far superior issue and i hope it dose not go down in quality, hopefully GWW will come up to a better level

Ralph

Woodworker25/08/2008 21:04:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Hi Ralph,

We're certainly not going to bring them any closer together. What I mean when I say they have complimentary strengths is that you can read one, then the other without feeling like they overlap. They're two totally different flavours and we want to keep it that way.

As to the quality; I can assure you that all involved are doing their best to make both titles as good as they can be.

Ralph Harvey25/08/2008 23:20:00
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles

Yes i can see the work in progress but i am glad to see this site is getting a better review and hopefully it will encourage more members

Ralph

Clive Bickley26/08/2008 09:25:00
11 forum posts
Hi Guys,

Last month I had a real rant about the content of GW204 and quite a few people agreed with me and further to my surprise no one condemned me. In fairness to Jon Bentman the editor, he did defend himself and quite rightly too as he is the boss and must do what he thinks best to increase his sales. Well Jonathan, I am sure you will read this, I have just finished reading issue 205 and I thoroughly enjoyed it!! I realise that the magazine must appeal to wide range of readers and therefore can not be perfect for everyone, but I think you have got the balance spot on this time with a wide range of articles and all to do with woodwork and that is what it says on the cover, ‘Good Woodworking’. As I said before I did enjoy all of the magazine but on a personal note, not having had the benefit of an apprenticeship or other formal training I do enjoy Jeff Gorman’s articles where he goes right back to the very basics. It’s a case of if you start right you have a chance of finishing right. However, the best new idea, I think it’s new, are the articles by Andy King where he combines practical help with mortising, drilling, routing etc. with tool tests on the tools that he actually uses to do the job. To me this is a benefit to all concerned. As a result of the above, I won’t be cancelling my subscription and I am looking forward to the next issue.

Regards,

Clive Bickley
Jonathan Bentman26/08/2008 16:34:00
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21 forum posts
Hello all Just a quick note here to say Hi and Thanks. Ralph, I'm glad you liked the issue (nice of you start a thread to say so, too) and I guess I'm chuffed you appreciated the changes to the website section! Clive, I'm glad you're enjoying the issue too. The feedback from you guys has been valued and while, as Oddjob says, some of the conceived changes have been coincidental with our discussions, we are striving to achieve a certain mix of content that we think woodworkers would appreciate - so all your comments help. I have to say Ben Plewes did a good job for us this month, in that context, with his two features contributing much to the mag's balance and sense of woodworking. The Pegasus (boat) story was meant to be quite hands-on too, but (to be honest) we came upon the story too late to see and witness the real nitty gritty work. I think Phil Davy (the author) had his work cut out in the circumstances, but looking at that story how did you rate it? What did you like, what didn't you like? Was there anything missing? I ask these questions as we'd like to continue the series, and we want to be sure we include the right material each time around. Anyway, back to the day job. Preparing the next GW. Glad to see you're liking WW so much too Ralph. As Ben says, two very different reads. All the very best Jonathan
Ralph Harvey26/08/2008 22:24:00
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles

Jonathan

I always say credit where credits due, i look forward to seeing how it goes with future issues

Ralph

Andy King07/09/2008 23:32:00
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170 forum posts
8 photos
19 articles

Hi Clive,

Thanks for your kind words, much appreciated!

The idea of working through techniques and using the tools jiga and aids available is something I've wanted to do for a long time, I think it's important to discern the need for some jigs or tools against hand methods.

The morticing feature is one of those - you soon realise that while its nice to be able to hand chop mortices accurately, in the real world, maybe not the most practical!

On the other hand, i'm just finishing a similar styled feature on dovetailing for issue 207, and although there are plenty of jigs ot there that will do a fast and perfect joint, i've dusted off the dovetail saw and hand cut a range of dovetails with walkthrough pictures, and thoroughly enjoyed it.

The difference between the two joints has me firmly in the camp of machines for mortices but the hand cut dovetail can be varied so much more than most machines or jigs offer and has its own beauty.

I think in instance where the joint is 'showcase' the art of the woodworker should be explored, and while jigs are fine for fast joints, the ability to control hand tools and turn out a fine joint is one that as woodworkers, I think we are all hoping to achieve, and practice is definitely the order of the day!

best regards,

Andy

Technical Editor

Good Woodworking Magazine

Cedric Wheeler08/09/2008 22:08:00
154 forum posts
31 photos

I  read with interest the article on morticing in GWW 205 and found it to be generally very good but why did it not include slot morticing. I have had several machines over the years with a  slot morticing attachment, but I think that they are most commonly found on surface planers. I personally favour this method as they are fast and very flexible provided that you use good cutters. I have used it a lot for furniture repair work where it is very good for cleaning out old mortices and joint sizes can be adjusted to fit non standard tenons.

 Cedric

Andy King08/09/2008 22:30:00
avatar
170 forum posts
8 photos
19 articles
Hi Cedric, I touched upon the use of the slot mortice attachment in the machine morticing section, but the problem is, availability in the UK market. While it used to be a feature of the planer block, I can't recall seeing any standalone planer thicknesser currently on the market that uses the system. It is usually available as a separate purchase if you buy a combi or universal machine, but even then, its often a special order. Europe favours the slot morticer, but the Uk is pretty well all standard plunge morticers, so that was why it was touched upon, as the availability is limited in the UK market. Hope this clears it up. cheers, Andy
Cedric Wheeler09/09/2008 10:59:00
154 forum posts
31 photos

Thanks for your reply Andy

I must admit that all my usage was during my 42 year sojourn in Africa. It is nice to know that the third world has got something over the first world!

Cedric

Ralph Harvey24/08/2008 13:06:00
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles

Well as no one has started a thread yet i will... credit where its due !!

I am impressed, the changes are good, i am particularly impressed that the advert for this site is now relevent to the site, with an update on what actually happened, there is the humerous comments on the "debate" over this sites previous column but the changes have happened so fair play.   will have no doubt it will all encourage more new members to give us a try. 

The article on the 240mph wooden supercar is a good read, whilst "The Challlenge cup" is an interesting project, particularly relevent at the moment with some members including myself trying out segmented work, although to split it into two episodes is a little disapointing,

I am also pleased to see the hand v machine article on morticing is now linked together and not over to separate sections,

Dont get me wrong i am not going to rush out and get the subscription but I will be buying it again to see if the changes stick or even get better

Ralph

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