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Another quick quiz question from Ron

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Ron Davis10/02/2010 20:28:01
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Platanus X hispanica, other wise known as the London Plane.
 
Where did it originate?
 
and why is called the London Plane?
 
I know Sparky is on line so you will have to be quick!
 
Ron
Drew Marsh10/02/2010 20:51:39
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May be cheating but I have managed to find the below passage from a well known search engine
The London Plane is very tolerant of atmospheric pollution and root compaction, and for this reason it is a popular urban roadside tree. It is now extensively cultivated in most temperate latitudes as an ornamental and parkland tree, and is a commonly planted tree in cities throughout the temperate regions of the world, not just London but Buenos Aires, New York City, Paris, Madrid, Melbourne, Mannheim, Shanghai, Chicago, Sydney, Rybnik and many others. It has a greater degree of winter cold tolerance than the Oriental Plane, and is less susceptible to anthracnose disease than the American Plane. The seeds are used as a food source by some finches and squirrels.
Drew Marsh10/02/2010 20:55:22
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with regards to it's origin... I can only find that it was first recorded in the 17th century in Spain. Any good????
 
Drew
Sparky10/02/2010 22:13:31
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London Plane seed ball
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Proteales
Family: Platanaceae
Genus: Platanus
Species: P. × hispanica
Binomial name
Platanus × hispanica
Muenchh.

The London Plane is a large deciduous tree growing to 20–35 m (exceptionally over 40 m) tall, with a trunk up to 3 m or more in circumference. The bark is usually pale grey-green, smooth and exfoliating, or buff-brown and not exfoliating. The leaves are thick and stiff-textured, broad, palmately lobed, superficially maple-like, the leaf blade 10–20 cm long and 12–25 cm broad, with a petiole 3–10 cm long. The young leaves in spring are coated with minute, fine, stiff hairs at first, but these wear off and by late summer the leaves are hairless or nearly so. The flowers are borne in one to three (most often two) dense spherical inflorescences on a pendulous stem, with male and female flowers on separate stems. The fruit matures in about 6 months, to 2–3 cm diameter, and comprises a dense spherical cluster of achenes with numerous stiff hairs which aid wind dispersal; the cluster breaks up slowly over the winter to release the numerous 2–3 mm seeds.

Origin

It was first recorded as occurring in Spain (Hispanic) in the 17th century, where the Oriental Plane and the American Plane had been planted in proximity to one another
 
The leaf and flower characteristics are intermediate between the two parent species, the leaf being more deeply lobed than P. occidentalis but less so than P. orientalis, and the seed balls typically two per stem (one in P. occidentalis, 3-6 in P. orientalis). The hybrid is fertile, and seedlings are occasionally found near mature trees.

Controlled reciprocal pollinations between Platanus occidentalis and P. orientalis resulted in good yields of germinable seed and true hybrid seedlings. Crosses of both species, as females, with P. racemosa and P. wrightii produced extremely low yields of germinable seed, but true hybrids were obtained from all interspecific combinations. Apomixis (asexual reproduction from non-fertilized seeds) appeared common in P. orientalis.

In 1968 and 1970, Frank S. Santamour, Jr., recreated the P. orientalis, P. occidentalis cross using a P. orientalis of Turkish origin with American sycamores (P. occidentalis). The offspring were evaluated following several years of exposure to anthracnose infection. Two selections'Columbia' and 'Liberty' were released in August, 1984.

 
USES
 

The London Plane is very tolerant of atmospheric pollution and root compaction, and for this reason it is a popular urban roadside tree. It is now extensively cultivated in most temperate latitudes as an ornamental and parkland tree, and is a commonly planted tree in cities throughout the temperate regions of the world, not just London but Buenos Aires, New York City, Paris, Madrid, Melbourne, Mannheim, Shanghai, Chicago, Sydney, Rybnik and many others. It has a greater degree of winter cold tolerance than the Oriental Plane, and is less susceptible to

Sparky10/02/2010 22:16:33
7631 forum posts
22 photos
Cont:-
 
to anthracnose disease than the American Plane. The seeds are used as a food source by some finches and squirrels.

The tree is fairly wind-resistant. However, it has a number of problems in urban use, most notably the short, stiff hairs shed by the young leaves and the dispersing seeds; these are an irritant if breathed in, and can exacerbate breathing difficulties for people with asthma. The large leaves can create a disposal problem in cities. These leaves are tough and sometimes can take more than one year to break down if they remain whole.

London Planes are often pruned by a technique called pollarding. A pollarded tree has a drastically different appearance than an unpruned tree, being much shorter with stunted, club-like branches. Although pollarding requires frequent maintenance (the trees must usually be repruned every year), it creates a distinctive shape that is often sought after in plazas, main streets, and other urban areas.


Me
Delete11/02/2010 13:41:35
575 forum posts
The leaf looks very similar to Maple.
I wonder how many times I have looked at one and thought it to be Maple.
 
Rog
Ron Davis11/02/2010 17:50:50
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1619 forum posts
201 photos
OK so we all know about Wikipedia! Drew has it right and first. As always a lot more info from Sparky.
 
The reason it got the name London Plane was because of its tolerance to atmospheric pollution. I was brought up in London and I can remember the deadly smogs, and the soot which stained every brick, all from domestic chimneys steam trains and factories.
 
In London the London plane was the on;y tree to grow there as it sheds both its bark and its leaves, which sheds the soot along with it. Untill I moved to Suffolk in 1951 I thought the London plane was the only tree.
 
We are banging on about the snow, belive me the smog was worse, you could see onlly a few yards and you could taste the stuff. Thousands died from chest infections, and it led to the clean air acts.
 
Ron
Sparky11/02/2010 18:08:22
7631 forum posts
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All credit goes to Drew Ron.......I just fill in the blanks
 
Gotta love Wiki
 
Ron, your to right about the smog...........it was all this from around the world that I think caused global warming..........the planet is only now showing the effects

Marc
Drew Marsh11/02/2010 20:35:06
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TEAMWORK!!! thats what its all about.
 
Can't wait for the next big Q, must say the picture questions are much harder as you can't cheat with the good old Wiki!!!
 
Drew
 
 
 
Sparky11/02/2010 21:42:11
7631 forum posts
22 photos
Drew,
Yep my friend, right on
 
Personaly I hate the picture questions because of that reason!
 
Marc  
Delete11/02/2010 23:24:39
575 forum posts
Talking of Smog I was having a discussion with my sister about the prewar Smogs. THe mirrors in the house got a smog film on them as well as the buildings. The last Smog I remember was in about 1962 or 3.
Ron Davis12/02/2010 19:12:03
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1619 forum posts
201 photos
Does this mean you want more?
 
Ron
Sparky13/02/2010 13:39:55
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Keep them coming Ron! ..........I'm learning!!
 
Marc
Ron Davis13/02/2010 15:30:03
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1619 forum posts
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So am I, partly from the researchand also from Sparkys' additional info
 
Ron
Sparky13/02/2010 15:38:37
7631 forum posts
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