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Workshop floor

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Jan De Klerk26/01/2010 12:58:38
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Hi all

I'm in the planning stage of a new workshop. It will be a timber construction with the internal dimensions 7.2m x 4.8m. I would like a wooden floor because I'm thinking that it can be better sound proofed and insulated than a concrete one. (I also like wood better than concrete) It will house a planer thicknesser @ 350 kg, a saw/ spindle moulder @ 540 kg, a bandsaw @ 170 kg and a workbench @ 160 kg and then all the other bench power tools that is common to a shop. My questions are :

What size and spacing must the support beams be?

What size and spacing must the joists be?

What material would be most suitable for the flooring?

Any tips and info would be appreciated . Thanks

Jan

Oddjob26/01/2010 13:44:48
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That is quite a big shed you are going to build and some heavy weight kit you are going to put in it!  Even if you intend to have a wooden floor you still need a very solid level base on which to site it.  Just spot slabs on the underlying ground on which to place the support beams will almost certainly result in the floor, and consequently the shed, twisting at least a little.  I would therefore recommend a concrete slab base whatever you do with the floor.  If you have the concrete slab raised with an effective DPC above surrounding ground level you could put your wooden floor directly on to it.  If you insist on the floor being suspended you are going to have to use either very thick boards or very close joists.  With a 540kg machine you are going to require some form of mechanical handling too.  Will you need access for a fork-lift truck or similar?
 
Given the size of shed you want I suspect you will require planning permission and byelaw approval anyway and that will require a minimum specification.
 
Richard
Jan De Klerk26/01/2010 13:55:36
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Thanks Richard
Access for the fork lift will be to but not in the shed, the machine is on a wheel kit at present and can be moved fairly easily if the floor is level and clean. If I had to cast a solid concrete slab, could i then only use joists?
Jan
Oddjob26/01/2010 14:50:37
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I don't see any reason why not - so long as there is no water running onto or coming up through the concrete slab.  That is what I would do if I were building a new shed anyway.
 
I would go for 1" boards on 3" X 2" joists at 12" centres.
 
Richard
Jan De Klerk26/01/2010 15:09:23
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Thanks Richard
The concrete base will be well above ground level and properly damp coarsed. My current workshop is in the garage and the concrete floor is very cold, it is also a bit on the small side.( see my workshop album) So during the next few months I'll get the planning permision.
Jan
Sparky26/01/2010 18:41:01
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Jan
I do hope your be taking some images of the build...........just to make us even more jealous!
Good luck with it
 
Marc
Doug26/01/2010 20:18:24
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Jan.
 
If you have a level damp free concrete base then the easiest thing would be to lay a damp proof membrane over the concrete, then put a layer of high density  insulation such as celotex on to the membrane & then use tongue & grooved boards glued together to make a floating floor.  
 
Moisture resistant chipboard sheets would be ok, but MDF would be better, though this would need a groove cutting on its edges & the boards joined  together with loose tongues, as i`ve not come across T&G MDF.
 
This is what i did in my last workshop, i painted the MDF with floor paint & it worked really well.
 
 
Baz  
Jan De Klerk27/01/2010 10:10:31
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Thanks for all the tips
Marc : I will post pictures as the building go along.
Baz: The loose tongues that you are suggesting would that be similar to a spline?What thickness  should the  MDF be  25mm?
 
Jan
sad sam27/01/2010 10:50:52
609 forum posts
251 photos
hi jan
jan have you considered a concrete sectional building
i decided on that when i moved house and had to get a new workshop
after getting a garage base laid 31ft by 11ft i had a 30ft by 10ft sectional
garage put up it was up and ready in a day
i then laid a wooden floor with insulation 2x2joists and the green coloured
loft boardsabout 600x2400 then covered them with 6mm ply which i can renew as and when
ithen lined the walls with 2x2 beams bolted onto brackets which you fix to the bolts holding the concrete sections together and chipboardalso insulate the walls
a coat of paint and i was making sawdust in a week
if you find this an option agood tip is to get some clear plastic sheets on the roof for
natural light
if you look at my albums th are photos of my workshop there
the cost of this project came in at around £3500 five years ago
hope this helps  sadsam
 
 
Jan De Klerk27/01/2010 12:57:58
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57 forum posts
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Thanks Sam all the info is a great help at this stage. It will help me to make informed decissions so that I'll only build once. The great thing about this forum is the amount of advice that you get from a great bunch of people
Jan
Sparky27/01/2010 16:57:29
7631 forum posts
22 photos
One big family here Jan.........dont get that anywhere else on the web
 
Marc
Delete27/01/2010 18:15:25
575 forum posts
Jan
 
The best idea is to talk to your local planning Department regarding the proposed "Garden Shed". The town and country Planning act allows for building under "Permited Development". You can build a Garden SHed, Greenhouse Summer house and COnservatory as long as certain conditions are met.
There must not be any clause on previous planning aplications prohibiting further development and the like. The roof if flat must not be higher than 2 metres if apex it can go up a further metre. If you call it a Garden Shed then it might come under Permited development, Call it a workshop and you could open a can of Worms.
 
I wanted to build an Observatory with a Domed roof. We ended up with a summerhouse with an Apex roof which slides off on to a Pergola. All covered by Permited development.
 
There is also rules regarding area of property and the area being covered. also distance from roads etc
 
Google Permited Development and read up.
 
If it were me I would put in a Concrete base with DPC as previously suggested. I would put in an insulation layer and cap with a screed  round the edge a concrete edge the height and width of a brick on to which the Shed can be placed The side boards can hang down over the edge on the concrete causing any rain to run off and not under the wall. If you have an Apex roof the heighest point will be roughly 9 ft 9 ins. The width you are planning will require some streingth to hold the roof up.
One way could be to have the Apex across the narrow dimension and the slope across the longer dimension. That way the Timber on the apex will not have to be as heavey as if it is the other way.
If yoy talk to the Planning department and ask for their advice as to what is allowed and if it can be done in Permited development . I have always found them very halpfull.
In my case I put up my Summer House and got a complaint from a Neighbour. (who had been consulted) Having had the Planning department involved they told the neighbour what the score was.
What ever you do dont make it sound as though you are going to run a business from it . Storeing garden tools and Hobby turning etc. The ride on Motor Mower if you dont have a field to cut might be a bit hard for them to believe.
 
Good luck
 
Rog
Jan De Klerk28/01/2010 18:52:24
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57 forum posts
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Thanks Roger for the info. The more I know the better the decision I can make
Jan
Jan De Klerk28/01/2010 18:52:34
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57 forum posts
9 photos
Thanks Roger for the info. The more I know the better the decision I can make
Jan

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