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Insurance for workshops

insuranc for workshops

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Eric Harvey 121/10/2009 18:00:17
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221 forum posts
81 photos
Hi all,
 
has anyone any idea who insures worshops and what sort of average price they charge you for doing so,just found my workshop isn`t covered by house insurance,even though we asked and was told it was,banks aye,what can you do with them,thanks for any advise guys and girls,
 
Regards,
 
Eric.
Oddjob21/10/2009 19:00:54
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1635 forum posts
79 photos
Mine is definitely covered by household insurance.
 
Richard
Ron Davis21/10/2009 19:08:12
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1619 forum posts
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Be careful Richard, mine has a limit which does not cover every thing, I assume you will have read your policy
 
Ron
Alan T.21/10/2009 19:42:28
1033 forum posts
98 photos
Hello Eric,
                 The small print on policies is so vague it's hard to tell whether you would get paid for a total loss or not. The replacement cost of the kit in my comparatively modest workshop would be around £ 5000.The worst event would be a fire.If the worst happened there is plenty of inflammable material around  to feed it.On one shelf alone I have Cellulose thinners,Paraffin,White spirit,Meths,Trichlorethylene plus the products for which these are solvents.With all the paint and sawdust as well it does not take much imagination to see the consequences of an 'event'. Does spontaneous combustion actually happen or is it an old wives tale? Is there anyonewho has never left a battery recharging all night accidentally? My home insurance company declined the risk out of hand. Is there a specialist company out there for cover of this kind? No doubt Marc will have the answer  Cheers   Alan  T..
Dave Atkinson21/10/2009 20:04:49
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672 forum posts
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Hi Eric

I can answer that one for you.  I am the insurance officer for the Association of Woodturners of Great Britain.

We deal with Ian Wallace who is the broker for the Craftsman policy from Aviva.  The basic cost of cover is £69.75 per annum for public liability with workshop contents costed at £32 per £1,000 on top. 

I have been discussing insurance with Ian just lately and it is important to make sure you are fully insured.  If not then in the event of a total loss the amount you get back will be drastically reduced.  Apparently this is called "subject to average" and it is very common on household contents policies where may people are under insured.

Ian's contact details are:

www.craftinsurance.co.uk/

hope that helps (by the way I have looked around and there would seem to be no other insurer with this type of policy)

Cheers Dave
Mike Jordan22/10/2009 09:54:37
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166 forum posts
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Hi Eric
AXA are currently my insurers working through a broker, costs are about the same as those given by Dave above. Last time this question was asked, someone suggested that NFU Mutual are used to insuring expensive kit housed in timber sheds. I may give them a ring at renewal time.
Mike
Oddjob22/10/2009 19:05:33
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Ron et al
 
Yes, I have read my policy (as everyone should)- not a very interesting plot but it has to be read unfortunately!  My workshop and garage contents are a specific addition to the normal policy to a maximum of £6000 replacement cost.  Individual items over £250 are listed.  The cost is £52 extra - subject to no commercial working.
 
I have friends who say that NFU Insurance do a good policy to suit - not my current insurer but I shall try them at renewal time.
 
Richard
Doug22/10/2009 19:50:21
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3415 forum posts
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I`m with Tesco.
When i renewed i stressed the point about having a work shop in my garage several times. The guy assured me that what ever my belongings & whether they were all in the garage or house they were covered.
 
I asked him this quite a few times, i think he was fed up with me by the time the call was over. BUT as with all insurance the proof will be in the pudding, i hope i never have to claim, but if i do i won`t be a happy pixie if they don`t pay out.
 
 
Baz
Alan Lappin23/10/2009 23:06:29
13 forum posts
I'm with Nationwide
When i renewed two years ago i told them about my work shop and asked if there was any extra to pay, there reply was that providing i wasn't charging a fee for my work then there was no charge .
I'm still concerned that should i need to claim there would be a reason not to pay or pay part of it only
Alan
Delete26/10/2009 17:04:21
575 forum posts
Baz
The proof is not in the pudding it is in the Policy. Get a copy and read it. If you dont understand anything ask in writing so you get a letter back and keep that with the policy.
 
Richard
A total of 6000 is not enough if that is for the Garage and Workshop. I doubt if it would cover rebuilding the Garage let alone replacing the tools and machines.
 
Alan T
 
I would strongly advise keeping all the inflamables in a steel cabinet.
 
Its easy to be wise after the event Dont believe what the man says  get it in writing they then can't say no onw would have ever said such a thing.
 
Regards
 
Roger

Edited By Roger B on 26/10/2009 17:22:16

Edited By Roger B on 26/10/2009 17:23:24

Oddjob26/10/2009 20:12:43
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1635 forum posts
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Roger
 
The £6000 cover is for workshop contents only.  The buildings - House, garage, greenhouse and workshop are all covered by my household buildings policy.
 
Richard
 
 
Ged Meager27/10/2009 22:02:51
222 forum posts
bECAUSE i LIVE IN SPAIN AND WE DONT HAVE THE SAME LEVEL OF TROUBLE AS THE UK MY WORKSHOP IS COVERED IN WITH MY HOUSE FOR 25 THOUSAND WHICH IS WHAT IT WOULD COST TO REPLACE EVERYTHING INCLUDING THE STRUCTURE
GED
dennis wake28/10/2009 00:42:15
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2044 forum posts
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hi all
just hade a shocking reminder of how inportant insurance is.
 
7 doors down has just had ther side gate kicked in and ther shed set on fire that spread to the house and has gutted it. they have had to moove out. the looky thing is ther 18 month chiled was at the gran perants that night as the bedroom that took the  most damage was the bedroom she would of been in. the only thing that saved them was the smoke alarm. the police are still looking for the arsenist  that has done this futile act.this all hapend at 3 in the morning.
dennis
  
   
Delete29/10/2009 18:55:27
575 forum posts
I guess a smoke and intruder alarm on the Workshop linked to the House is perhaps worth a thought. I have always felt that a hose system in houses would be a good idea. I suppose the Brigade would prefer people to get out and let it burn untill they get there.
Thats one thing I am thankfull the RAF trained us all to fight fires but I have never had to put it into practice.
 
Roger
dennis wake29/10/2009 23:05:42
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2044 forum posts
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hi Roger
    i have actualy got the house alarm riged up to my shed and is a good thing as ins companys like that. as for the hose real sistem i may not agree with you there as a lot of people do not know what to do with it propely and it may then end up fatal. i to were trained in the forces(RN) and know what and were to point a hose or a extinguisher. but i think that the best thing in a fire situation is to get out and let the bragade deal with it.
dennis

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