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Mike Garnham21/06/2008 09:03:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

George,

with oil......its just that by having 250mm of insulation in the walls, 500mm in the loft, and triple glazing, plus a south-facing conservatory, this house stays warm without heating. There is a mechanical ventilation system to keep ventilation heat losses to a minimum.

Whilst it is entirely automatic, the heating generally doesn't come on before late November/ early December, and goes off again by about April. It never comes on 2 days in a row, and even then is only ever on for 2 or 3 hours max. Cooking Christmas dinner keeps the house warm for about 3 or 4 days. 

It cost about 2 to 3% extra to build it like this.

Oh.....and I built next door as well.

Mike 

George Arnold21/06/2008 13:09:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

 Mike

 I'm glad Sparky is not correct, I thought it was two 6in nails and a length of wire, but joking aside thats some insulation I've just had the insulation increased in the loft to 10in being over seventy the nice man at the government paid for it. the bungalow is of a canadian design and the walls are cast concrete with 2in of polystyrene  insulation, and double glazed, it was built some 30 years ago, so that was considered  good for the time, but standards have advanced since then, perhaps you don't keep the house as hot as my wife likes it, I reckon it's about 180f in the shade! we have always been behind in this country only building for a temperate clime,

George

Mike Garnham21/06/2008 16:18:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Gerorge,

I presume the insulation is inside the concrete outer skin, with some plasterboard (or similar) on the inside face?

If so, then condensation is the potential problem, on the inside of the concrete, and ventilation is the answer. Ideally, the insulation would be on the outside of the concrete panel.

Ten inches in the loft is the bare minimum these days......I always specify 12" to be on the safe side. I still see houses with 1" in the loft whose owners say "Yes, my loft's insulated....no problem"!!!

If someone did the insulation for you, George, check that they haven't blocked up the eaves ventilation (by having the insulation press hard-up under the roofing felt). Your loft should be drafty....but all of the drafts should be above the insulation.

We keep our house at 21.4 degrees.

Mike

George Arnold21/06/2008 17:26:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

 Mike

The insulation is on the out side of the concrete skin with a board facing which . has been roughcast, inside is plaster board that has been skimmed ,

You certainly don't skimp on the heating thats about where my wife sets the room stat, we had a new boiler fitted last year, the old boiler was very basic, this new one had to be a condenser boiler by law, as the boiler was in the middle of the bungalow we had to have a pump to pump the condense out side, after two failing in a short time I chased out the floor so it now runs out under gravity to a soakaway,no more problems.

Did your cost include the hot water, although the way you spoke you have a solar hot water system? I only wish mine only cost so little.

George.

Mike Garnham21/06/2008 19:13:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

No, the hot water is orthodox. We are in a conservation area and the local authority won't allow solar panels visible from the road in these areas. The £40 I quoted was for heating only......and when I buy the next tank of oil I reckon the price will go up to about £70 or £80 per year because of the high fuel price.

Mike 

Woodworker23/06/2008 14:18:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Hi guys, Can we keep this thread on topic please i.e. article suggestions only? It'll make my job a lot easier when it comes to searching through the archive. Thanks, Ben
Mike Garnham23/06/2008 14:49:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Oooops........sorry Ben, my fault!

How about a series on mills: wind mills & water mills .......theory, history and restoration?

An article on timber certification might be an interesting one too. And my favourite......bridges. There are some staggering wooden bridges around the world, and they would make a great story.

Mike 

Woodworker23/06/2008 15:06:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Good ideas there Mike will keep my eyes peeled.
Mike Riley23/06/2008 18:47:00
337 forum posts
5 photos
5 articles
You don't read GWW do you MIke ? Water Mills and Timber Certification covered in last issue and next / current (depending on whether its on the shelves yet respectively. Bridges - I volunteer to take a tour round the New England area and write up the bridges on my return Cheers Mike
Mike Garnham23/06/2008 19:27:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Mike,

Damn.....that means I'll have to go and spend some money! I really should read these magazines, shouldn't I?

Righto Mike, you do New England......I'll do China and Japan, then maybe we can do Europe between us?

Mike 

George Arnold23/06/2008 19:42:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

 I'll do a local water mill.

George

George Arnold26/06/2008 11:17:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

 Ben

How about an aarticle on screw driver bits, I never seem to pick up the right bit to fit the screw, I know I have seen one make of screws that has the bit in the box of screws,

George

derek willis26/06/2008 14:00:00
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2314 forum posts
1 articles

George,

You anly have three sizes of Pozidrive bits, the most used being No.2, I have for years used, screwfix' diamnd tipped 50 mm bits, as nearly all the screws you use will be that, they last for yonks.

Keep Nos. 1 and 3 handy,but you will hardle ever use thm.

Derek. 

P J26/06/2008 18:05:00
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889 forum posts
103 photos

George,

If you want to know more about screw driver bits and screw (while you are waiting for the article of course) you'd do well looking in a Screwfix catalogue. At the front usual there's a description a buyers guide every think you'd need to know. For free catalogue 0500 414141.

As Derek says PZ 2 are the most common I get a Trade pack like this and just top up with odd boxes whenever I run out or need a different size. Then when i get low on all screws I get another Trade pack. £7.99 you can't go wrong! "Oh yes all PZ 2!"

P J

Big Al26/06/2008 18:37:00
1602 forum posts
73 photos
Ben Any chance that you could put the anant circular plane review on the site please? I did try to buy the issue, but missed it by a few days. Al

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