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best spindle moulder

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David Self05/07/2009 11:13:01
5 forum posts
Hi all,
I want to invest in a spindle moulder for quite a lot of panel door making. Is there a model that anyone can recommend - max. £2000. What about the startrite t160?
Cheers in anticipation of continuing good advice.
Rob Johnson23/07/2009 18:32:45
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378 forum posts
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The best Spindle I have ever used was an old Wadkin EQ, a heavy duty beastie with very little vibration and plenty of power to work effortlessly. Second to that was a German one that had adjustable "fingers" on the fence that could slide and lock close to the cutter block to negate the use of subfences (this was in Frankfurt, never seen it in the UK)
That said I actually own an Axminster one (so I can use my router cutters in it) and an old green thing of obscure parentage!
I have no experience of the Startrite T160, though I would strongly advise that any budget includes the purchase of a power feed. The power feed makes repetetive runs easier with smoother mouldings etc and above all much safer. ( I can switch my p/f between machines)
You have little in the way of information in your profile, so do you have any training or experience with these machines? My first day as an apprentice I was introduced to a machinist with only his middle finger and part of his thumb left on one hand, the rest had gone up the extractor on a spindle moulder. They require total concentration and respect.
jay 123/07/2009 20:59:45
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72 forum posts
6 photos
hello rob or any one else out their will give me some advice on a power feed i got fox moulder looking at the axminster site they have power feed called co matic m3 has anyone got one
Rob Johnson24/07/2009 10:29:00
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378 forum posts
19 photos
Jay, do not know that model mate, mine is the Axminsters own one, which is sufficient for my needs, most joinery shops use Maggi power feeds, but they are quite pricey though worth every penny of it in my opinion. Replacement drive wheels can prove costly (especially when people do not ensure the cutter will miss the wheels before starting up) so check on costs of these too. With care the rubber will last a long time.
Fox moulder sounds like it belongs in X-Files though!
jay 124/07/2009 15:55:39
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72 forum posts
6 photos
rob i would like to know what would be the best size power feed its for light trade use and hobby the one on axminster site is a one eight horse power or will i need something bigger
Rob Johnson25/07/2009 04:06:32
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378 forum posts
19 photos
Looks like APTC has rebadged their tools again, the Comatic AF32 looks exactly like the one I have with their name on. It has served me well.
Most of my time is spent in workshops other than mine but it did get a lot of use when fitting out a couple of barges and a house in France. I never run it above 8mtr/min in order to reduce clean up of the work pieces, of course the higher the rpm of the spindle the faster the feed speed should be. It is a balance of reduced cutter marks and burning the work piece.
Get the best you can afford, is the best advice, decide what you want to do with any bit of kit and recognize it's limitations too. ie. even the best power feeds sometimes become power hold downs when running long window cill sections (for conservatories) and need help to push them through.

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