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Sound proofing

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Robbie03/05/2008 07:23:00
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129 forum posts
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Hi all,

I would be interested to hear peoples views on how best to sound proof a timber framed workshop?

Rob

Mike Garnham03/05/2008 08:11:00
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1 photos

Robbie,

I guess you mean sound-proofing to keep the neighbours happy?

Ideally, a heavyweight construction is part of the answer, but as you have a timber framed building, the key is the type of insulation you use. Mineral fibre insulation ("fibreglass"), cut oversize and tightly fitted between the studs and joists is the start. Sound waves seek out gaps, so take great care not to leave any. Use as much mineral wool as you can find space for.

Draft strips around doors and windows will make a really big difference. 

Do use double glazing. If you only have single glazing, then a home-made secondary glazing  set-up will help no end.

Given the impracticality of hanging heavy curtains in a workshop, the only other thing you might consider is lining the inside of your shed with an acoustic dampening board. These come in a variety of guises.........some are covered in hessian, some have dozens of little holes per square inch, and some are just "furry". I imagine that all of them would be susceptible to damage in a workshop, so have a good look around before you buy. Let me know if you plan to go down this route, and I can look up the alternatives for you. 

Hope this helps.

Mike 

Doug03/05/2008 09:15:00
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3415 forum posts
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After the insulation, plaster board is fairly cheap. On site i`ve seen 2 different  thicknesses of board put one on top of another.

Different thicknesses break up the soundwave, i`ve seen a thin rubber membrain put between layers of plasterboard to.

The new building regs have gone to town on noise, so there are loads of new products, like sound board, it just depends on your budget.

But from what i`ve been told multi layers of differing thickness is the key.

Baz

Mike Garnham03/05/2008 10:17:00
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Plasterboard is good because of its density, but I'm not sure I would want plasterboard on my workshop walls. I always think of plasterboard as talcum powder wrapped in paper!

A protective layer of something over the plasterboard would work. Ideally, one of the acoustic boards, but even OSB would  be OK. 

Robbie03/05/2008 13:50:00
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129 forum posts
34 photos

Thanks Guys,

I was thinking along the lines of 100mm fibreglass between the studs and then 9 or 12mm ply over the top. Maybe peg board would be better than ply then as it has loads of holes?

Mike Garnham03/05/2008 14:15:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos
Yep, Robbie......that will be perfect. Ply can act almost like a sounding board.........bouncing the sound around.
Robbie03/05/2008 14:57:00
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129 forum posts
34 photos
Thanks Mike / Baz.  
Scrit11/05/2008 15:46:00
16 forum posts

I'd avoid fibreglass as a sound insulator as it's rubbish! Rockwool or mineral wool is a far better sound insulator and is the type of material specified in new builds and extensions these days. The technique of layering two boards of differential thicknesses works, but make sure that the joints are offset from each other and consider trying to get a 10 to 15mm air gap between boards using battening bonded to the face of the under board with a building adhesive such as GripFill

Scrit

Mike Garnham11/05/2008 17:10:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Scrit,

the different thicknesses thing is a red herring. The ability of plasterboard to reduce the passage of sound is directly related to the total thickness: the more, the better. Staggering the joints is so as to not leave a straight path for sound, and is good practise. 

As I said previously, though, plasterboard may not be the best material in a workshop.

Mike 

P J11/05/2008 17:59:00
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889 forum posts
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Rob

Alan Holthan did a artical on this go Tools & Workshop at top of page then go Setting up shop pt1 its near the bottom of page.

I used to build my workshop 3 years ago 3''x 2'' stud-work 24'' on center with the rockwool wish I'd put plastic on that, then 12mm ply which in great for hanging stuff on the walls. you know floor space is a premium, i also insulated the roof the same way and the floor with polystyrene so warm in winter cool'ish in summer also i used internal sliding shutters on the windows mainly for security. I don't have any complaints from my neighbours as i've done 3 jobs for the one side and 2 for the other and got paid.

P J 

Doug11/05/2008 20:01:00
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3415 forum posts
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Mike.

Interested to here you say different thicknesses is a red herring, as building control stipulated this on some apartments i was working on.

I`m not saying you are wrong but surely building control don`t ask for this kind of thing for no reason.

As for insulation, i was adviced to use rockwool acoustic insulation, which i have & have been very satisfied with.

Baz

Scrit12/05/2008 00:10:00
16 forum posts

Mike

Ditto Baz's experience with the BCO. As to the Rockwool that's based on the experience of having to insulate myself from a noisy neighbour a few years back where it was necessary to use several techniques combined to get the desired result. In terms of the correct material for a shed ordinary plasterboard may be less suitable than the green moisture-resistant variety, although that is somewhat harder to come by

Scrit

Mike Garnham12/05/2008 07:22:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Baz, Scrit,

I would refer you to "The White Book".....the huge book by the leading manufacturer of plasterboard. 

It isn't the different thicknesses of board that makes the difference, but it may well be that 2 different thickness boards were the most cost-efficient way of achieving the stipulated dB reduction. The calculation may have been made that 21mm total thickness of board was required, so the BCO said use 12mm & 9mm boards........it isn't the difference that is the important thing, it is the total thickness. (Actually, strictly, it is the weight per unit area that is the critical factor).

Another factor is that there are different densities of board available. Working with it on site the difference you would notice is that 2 similar sized boards would weigh different amounts.

I keep going back to the point, though, that plasterboard is not the right answer in a workshop, where inevitably the walls will get a bit of a bashing.

Mike 

derek willis12/05/2008 08:37:00
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2314 forum posts
1 articles

I enquired from one of the biggest insulation distributors in the country about this problem, they supplied me with comressed Rockwool slabs, cut to fit tightly between studs, worked very well, (I used it for an internal wall).

Derek. 

Doug12/05/2008 21:43:00
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3415 forum posts
35 photos

The thing with plasterboard Mike is it`s a quarter the price of the same thickness ply.

So you could have 2" of plasterboard for the price of one 1/2" thick ply.

As for it not being being the right answer, both of my last workshops have been plaster boarded & i`ve had no problem, especially with noise. You stick two pieces together & you`ll find them fairly solid.

My last house was terraced & my present is semi-detached, so in both cases my neighbours have been very close. As money is tight, i have found plasterboard to be the most cost effective way of cutting out the noise from inside my workshops.

I`m not trying to say it`s the best to line walls with (i would have liked 3/4 ply) but when you`re on a budget, i don`t think you can beat it.

Baz

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