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Planes...

Hand Planes to be more precise...

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derek willis02/05/2008 13:33:00
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2314 forum posts
1 articles

I certainly was not critisizing the general content, just the affectionate tone of some of it.

Glad you got what you wanted Mike.

derek. 

Sparky02/05/2008 21:03:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos

Left or right side of the 

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/2826/fartinginbedul3.gif

Mike

I'll go with the left! 

http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/2369/82071310ho0.gif

 

http://img254.imageshack.us/img254/2715/63920200qk3.gif

Mike Garnham02/05/2008 21:12:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos
Very good, Marc......has that taken you all day?!!!!!!!
Andy King02/05/2008 21:17:00
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170 forum posts
8 photos
19 articles

Hi Mike (G)

I wouldn't have any problems using yours, or anyone elses plane - I'm a big advocate of trying tools first, then trying to solve problems  if they arise. I can never understand why people want to flatten a plane for no reason! Why try and solve a problem if it isn't there? Same as making shavings and taking pictures with micrometers to show how fine they are. I can do it with a bog standard Stanley, with the blade supplied, but if you have to take a bit off at sub thou levels, you'll be there a while! I prefer to do woodwork with my tools, not take pics of shavings... although saying that, I do demo at shows with a couple of planes taking very fine shavings to convince people that technique is the most important thing in sharpening, not to have a range of stones and gadgets.

I use one Trend diamond stone, a piece of leather and honing paste if i want to tweak it a little more, but I usually use it straight off the stone. This is more important to me than any high end engineering. Don't get me wrong, it's really nice to be able to use a top end plane and see how well they really perform, but you can get pretty good results with minimal effort if you want to. As long as the sole is not twisted or bent and the iron beds down well without chattering, you can get decent results.

I used to work with a few old boys who didn't even consider 'fettling and flattening' - their hand and eye skills were more than enough to bring any board into shape, and watching a couple of them shooting edges for rub joints was a joy to behold, and that is equally important. Owning the best tools won't make you any better if you don't know how to drive them!

cheers,

 Andy

Olly Parry-Jones02/05/2008 21:28:00
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2776 forum posts
636 photos

I agree Andy - "if it ain't broken, why fix it!"

I had the pleasure of using a Veritas shoulder plane today at college. While it's a lovely bit and all you have to give the company a lot of credit for the way they've researched in to and developed on the ergonomics of the plane. I proved to myself that I could get similar results (raised and fielded panel in sycamore) using one of the old Record planes we have, but with the extra knobs, all the adjustments and possibilities for holding the tool while working, it made the job so much easier, more comfortable and, therefore, perhaps I also enjoyed it a little bit more... 

Doug02/05/2008 21:48:00
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3415 forum posts
35 photos

Mike & all.

My planes a No8 which i use for most hand planed things & a concave & convex plane for radii. I also have a lie Nielson low angle block plane, which i saw being demonstrated " & was so impressed i bought one".

http://www.getwoodworking.com/sites/5/images/member_albums/5556/CIMG3142.JPG


I have to admit the finish i get off my wadkin surface planer (also pictured) is superb so i hardly have to do anything else to any timber put through it.

I agree with most of the comments posted, if it works for you great, both the planes pictured must be 50 to 60 years old, i was given both of them. Yes i`ve had to fettle them a bit but the cut on them both is incredible. I wouldn`t swop them for any modern one, having said that i think my low angle block is also superb.

To me the finished result is the important thing, not how you got there. Just because my way is different to someone else`s doesn`t make either wrong, just different & something else to learn. I hate being told something is not the way it should be done, just through narrow mindedness.

Baz

Olly Parry-Jones02/05/2008 21:53:00
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2776 forum posts
636 photos

That's nice Baz - just don't switch your planer on just yet or else you'll have two big holes in your wall!!

I know that with a Jack plane (no.5), it's common to grind a slight camber on the plane iron, but what do you do with the longer planes, no. 6, 7 and 8?

Sparky02/05/2008 21:59:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos

I've still got my Stanley No 5 1/2 and 4 planes & both rounded and flat spokeshaves from when I left school..........30 years back

 Always wanted a plough plane  ..just liked the look of them.  

Mike

Yes mate, been slightly busy thinking it up!

Mike Garnham02/05/2008 22:00:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

Thanks for that Andy......

The one thing that has puzzled me most since joining this forum is how some people can be so obsessed with the minutest detail of their planes, when I have always been more than happy with the results I achieve with a couple of cheap, un-fettled, busted-up old wrecks! I don't claim any particular skill........I just always thought that planes planed, no matter what, as long as they were sharp. 

I must invest in a diamond stone, though, because the flat bits on my oilstone are getting smaller and smaller. If people might struggle to use someone else's plane, they would certainly struggle to use another's old oilstone!

By the way, I thoroughly enjoyed your article on the Sheffield plane makers. Keep up the good work!

Mike 

Doug02/05/2008 22:08:00
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3415 forum posts
35 photos

Olly, you really do worry to much, i bring the table up when i`ve finished.

As for the blade on No 8 i grind it perfectly square & just ease the corners of the blade, so not to leave lines.

Baz 

Woodworker03/05/2008 01:01:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Well, my ebay no.7 is destined for a display case somewhere because we don't get on. When I say the sole is all over the place, I'm not exaggerating ~ it's the cast iron equivalent of a raspberry ripple! I've managed pretty well over the years with a no. 5 1/2, no. 4 and low angle block. Pretty much formed all my habits with those tools so anything else that comes along I consider a luxury. It's always nice to have more choice, but old habits die hard.
Sparky03/05/2008 21:35:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos
Well Ben, if you use the same as I and turn out work like you do, I should be 10% there!
Woodworker03/05/2008 23:08:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Only 10% Marc! It's amazing what you can do with the basics.
Mike Garnham08/05/2008 17:17:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos
Right, you've seen my planes, and heard my views.............now, I'm fettling!! Mainly to see what all the fuss is all about........but also following the principal of "don't knock it until you've tried it". I'll report when I've finished.
Sparky08/05/2008 21:54:00
7631 forum posts
22 photos

I like seeing the really old tools that made all that beautiful furniture in the 16-17-1800's, the things they achieved was an art to themselves.......but now I feel we have all the modern tools but lack all the apprenticeships that will produce the future works......yes, there are the few but now you buy from shops where its all machined made and I feel the hand made art isn't there anymore.

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