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matabo 260 planer thicknesser

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jay 106/03/2009 19:12:01
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 i have the chance of buying the matabo 260c cheap any one have one and how good are they 
Mailee06/03/2009 23:56:13
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I used to have one a few years ago and they are a very good machine.
Dominic Collings08/03/2009 16:02:01
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Good as a thicknesser but poor as a planer. Frustrating to set up and the removable out feed table means you're forever having to check it. I have the Record version which I now use soley as a thicknesser.

Mailee08/03/2009 18:24:45
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I have to agree with you on the removable table Dominic although I didn't have a lot of trouble setting it up to plane. I now have the Elu version which IMO is much better as the tables swing up out of the way. I had the Metabo (in it's Electra Beckum guise) for a number of years and it served me well.
Dominic Collings09/03/2009 09:10:04
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I guess it depends on how much it has been used. I use mine a lot and the problem I've found is that there are grub screws, one each side of the out feed table which tilt the table to enable you to get it parallel with the infeed table. These are just tapped into aluminium which over time wears so I guess mine are a little slack. This in turn means that they can move with the vibration of the machine and removing and replacing the table just adds to it. The Record had safety micro switches all over the place. One in particular stops the machine from operating as a planer if the extraction duct is not under the table. It's simply not necessary and as it's exposed to a lot of dust etc when thicknessing and so tends to stick and be a real pain. I bypassed the wiring to that switch. I do use the extraction port in the correct place but if it doesn't make contact with the switch it doesn't stop the machine from working. The only other problem I have is that it eats through drive belts, which on the record, is effectively a wide rubber band. This stretches with use and there's no tensioner so after a while the in and out feed rollers stop working on all but the smallest of passes. Record charge about £10 for a belt but then want £10 for postage!!! Axminster charge about £3.50 for there equivalent model so I make sure I always add one to my order. I go through one about every 6 months. All that said, like I say I use it only as a thicknesser so have remover the infeed table and replaces it with a plywood guard. Mirco switches aren't a problem as I never need to touch any of them. I don't even have to switch it from one mode to another so if that switch ever failed I could just bypass that one too. For all the modifications I have a small stand alone thicknesser with an induction motor. Something that's not available on the market at the moment. For that reason alone, if there's one going cheap I'd go for it.

Olly Parry-Jones09/03/2009 10:07:52
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I used to own Axminster's Perform CCNPT  machine, which is now sold as the Axminster AWEPT106, if I've got that right. It's an identical machine to the Record, EB and Metabo models and I can only echo what's been said by Mailee and Dom.
 
I don't have this machine anymore but, I'm wondering now whether it would've been possible to lock the grub screws in place with LocTite or similar, to stop them moving?
 
That issue with the drive belts used to drive me nuts! Every so often, you'd hear it squealing and new that, sooner or later, the infeed roller was gonna stop working!! I think the problem here was that the face of the pulley wasn't running parallel with the washer at the end of the drive shaft... If you put a straightedge on this, you could see how the belt was being unnecessarily stretched. I've not come acros anyone who's actually cured this problem (aside from buying spare belts...) but, if I still had the machine now, I'd be looking to remove the circlip and put some shims (washers?) behind the pulley to bring it further forward, which may have helped.
 
After two-years of light use, the cheap Chinese motor on mine burnt out. I think this was partly my own fault though as it happened when I had it plugged in to an extractor with automatic take-off... This P/T has a 2,200w/3HP motor, which is the maximum recommended size of power tool you should use...!
 
To be perfectly honest, I don't see why the motor needs to be of this size anyway. All it does is put a strain on your 13amp supply and means you may not be able to run extractor at the same time - I think I had to turn the planer on first, wait, and then switch the extractor on. My current machine (Axminster AW106PT) has similar capacities but only an 1,100w motor, which seems perfectly adequate to me. When the old motor burnt out, I think I replaced it with a 1,500w motor anyway (all I could find) and it didn't seem to affect the workings of the machine.
Dominic Collings09/03/2009 10:45:28
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I'm glad it's not just me woth the belts OPJ. I've toyed with the ides or adding a tensioner, just a wheel with a spring pressing against the belt. I think it would give me double the use out of it time wise. Another thing that's been on the to do list.

jay 109/03/2009 14:57:06
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i bought the machine i have say got it very cheap brand new x display model opj your right about the power have to turn on the planer first then the extractor dominic not looking forward to the belt drive thing and yes it is a pain removing the table every time you want to thickness because i have a habit of forgetting at least one piece of stock nearly every time but what i want to know is will the motor stand up to the test of a lot of  work and do the disposible blade last long getting some stuff from axminster wondering will i buy couple of sets of blades
Dominic Collings09/03/2009 15:30:28
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The record has resharpenable blades which are about twice the thickness of the disposable ones. That said a friend has the SIP model with disposable knives and they are much sharper and get a slightly better finish. As for the motor thats seems to be the only variable bit on these clones. The Metabo sourced motor should be up to the job. As for the belt it's easy to change just a pain when it goes with no replacement and you have to wait several days before one arrives. After a while you get to know the tell tail signs that it's on its way out and order one sooner rather than later.
Olly Parry-Jones09/03/2009 16:56:34
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I think that these factors with the motor and the drive belt are all dependant on how much you use the machine, really. As I mentioned before, you can actually hear the drive belt 'squealing' when it's on the way out! To save some of the wear and tear, if you're really concerned, you could try removing it for planing operations (when it isn't needed) and re-fit it every time you want to thickness something. This only drives the feed rollers below and has now effect on the rotation of the cutter block.
 
Your motor should be fine as well, unless you're constantly asking the machine to remove 3mm or more! I always like to finish with light cuts anyway, as they give a better finish.
 
It's hard to say how long they should last... Bear in mind that they are double-edged. So, when one edge become dull, you can take them out and flip them once before you need to fit a new pair. I don't think they can be sharpened though.
jay 109/03/2009 18:43:23
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thanks opj ill bare that in mind
Mailee09/03/2009 19:45:43
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I think my machine must have been an older version as it didn't have any micro switch on the bed. I never had to replace a drive belt either? Maybe it didn't get enough use out of me. I am very happy with the machine I have now though as it has given me very good service with just the occasional sharpening. As for my smaller (jointer) Planer it destroyed the top pulley last week! Mind you that is a Taiwanese copy of a Grizzly.
jay 110/03/2009 14:56:10
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i have to say they went a bit over board whit the switches and did you import the copy your self mailee
Mailee10/03/2009 22:34:52
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No Jay, I bought it on e-bay from a guy in Liverpool. It has been a good little jointer as it only has a width of 6" but has a three cutter head and is solid cast iron. Only thing I can foult with it is there is no dust extraction on it so a little messy. As for the Elcetra Beckum (Metabo) planer/thicknesser it was about ten years ago and maybe before they started fitting the micro switches to them.
Dominic Collings11/03/2009 07:08:13
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I bought mine used about 3 years ago and I suspect it was at least three years old then so 6 years plus. It's blue so predates Records machine colour change to green.  As for a planer I too have a 6 inch cast iron model which I said at the time that I couldn't foresee when I would need a wider capacity than that. However on that last couple of project I've had to eat those words. It's a shame the price of an 8 inch model is so much higher.

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