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A Bowl Turned on Hot Glue

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Ralph Harvey18/02/2009 00:14:03
3274 forum posts
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1. The timber required for this project is one at 235mm x 75mm (9 ¼ “x 3”) I have used Iroko. We will also need 2 scrap timbers approx. 75mm x25mm (3” x 1”)

2, Mount the first of the scrap timbers on the lathe, it can be on a chuck or a faceplate, (if you use a chuck be aware of the screw positions whilst turning)  Then turn the face and edge flat ready to mount the bowl blank to.

3, Before gluing the blank we first need to position the tailstock, close enough to tighten up and hold the bowl blank in place whilst the glue sets, we also need to position the tool rest so it will not foul the bowl blank

A single bead of glue should be sufficient to hold the bowl blank, but use enough to make yourself comfortable.  


 4, Then tighten up the tailstock to centre and steady the timber whilst the glue sets this should only take a few seconds, (in hotter whether it may take longer)


Ralph Harvey18/02/2009 00:16:27
3274 forum posts
315 photos
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5,  True up the face and edge to make sure the timber is reasonably balanced to turn the rest of the bowl.


6, Now we can turn the outer shape of the bowl, it is important to be able to easily remove items from the bowl so I like a fluent curve leaving no tight corners inside the bowl.


7, Also incorporate a foot in the design as this will be used to centre the bowl when we reverse it.


8, Sand the outer face of the bowl, starting with 120 grit then 180, 240 and 320 grits you can go to 400 grit as well if you wish, after each grit sand in the direction of the grain.

The purpose of each grit is to remove the marks left by the previous grit, ultimately leaving a blemish free surface

A scrap piece of timber can be used to steady the work whilst sanding.
 

 It is at this point we would normally seal and polish the outside of the bowl by applying a coat of sanding sealer then cutting back with 00 00 wire wool, then apply a coat of friction polish and finally buff up with a clean cloth


Ralph Harvey18/02/2009 00:19:53
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles

9, You can also add a decorative detail to the edge prior to polishing and removing it from the lathe.


10, Remove the timber from the lathe and place it to one side make sure you place it in a way to not damage the surface.


11, The next step is to mount the second scrap timber to the lathe and again turn the face and edge flat ready to remount the bowl


12, To re-mount the bowl we first need to turn a recess to accept the foot, so using some callipers measure the foot to determine the recess size


13, Transfer the dimensions from the callipers to the scrap timber


Ralph Harvey18/02/2009 00:22:25
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles

14, Turn the recess to exactly accept the foot dimensions it important to have a tight fit to re-mount the bowl exactly.


15, Again using 1 or 2 beads of glue and the tailstock to centre and steady it, we can remount the bowl blank.


16,  The wall thickness needs to be 7mm so from the outside edge measure back 7 .5 mm and mark a line, then on the inside (waste side) cut a grove to about 5mm, this will act as a stop so we have a point to start the tooling when turning the inside of the bowl


17, Now using a 3/8” or 1/2”  bowl gouge remove the waste timber from the inside. Keep the tailstock in place for as long as you can, but if it hinders your access then move it.

Stop the lathe and check your wall thickness regularly either with a pair of callipers or by finger and thumb.


Ralph Harvey18/02/2009 00:24:27
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles

18, We now need to sand the inside of the bowl starting with 120 grit then 180, 240 and 320 grits you can if you like go to 400 grit as well , the purpose of each grit is to remove the marks left by the previous grit, ultimately leaving a blemish free surface.  After each grit sand in the direction of the grain.

 It is at this point we would normally seal and polish the inside of the bowl by applying a coat of sanding sealer then cutting back with 00 00 wire wool, then again apply a coat of friction polish and finally buff up with a clean cloth


19, Remove from the lathe and place carefully on the bench, the last part is to remove the scrap timber from the foot, there are several methods to do this, If too much glue has not been used either gently pry it off, place it in the microwave for a few seconds at a time, or as I do, place the scrap timber on a soft surface and split it with a sharp chisel


20, Particular care is needed to make sure you don’t mark the bowl ! Finally clean off any remaining glue and re-polish the whole piece by hand.


21, From time to time it pays to cut some bowls in half to see how accurate your turning is ? However in this case it is the next step to the end piece I have planed


dennis wake18/02/2009 12:18:30
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2044 forum posts
1451 photos
1 articles
hi ralph
 this is a very good artical this will definatly help  the beginer to try to turn a bowl.
dennis
Sparky18/02/2009 14:47:35
7631 forum posts
22 photos
Very nice indeed and I should of seen this first before I made my comment in another thread
Ralph Harvey18/02/2009 19:03:36
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles
Dennis Marc,
 
If it helps someone thats great, I am hoping to do a few more ideas as well, hopefully for everyones tastes
 
Marc
 
Just seen the other post, more on this piece to come.
 
Ralph
Sparky18/02/2009 21:14:06
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Dave Atkinson19/02/2009 11:24:51
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672 forum posts
115 photos
Great article Ralph.  I'm a bit busy at the moment but I;m hoping to post one in the not too distant about natural edge work.

Cheers Dave 
Sparky19/02/2009 19:39:12
7631 forum posts
22 photos
That will be welcome Dave.
Marc
Doug19/02/2009 21:04:36
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3415 forum posts
35 photos
Great run through Ralph, Since seeing you i`ve dug out my face plate & hot glue gun, it sure speeds up initial work holding.
 
Look forward to seeing your article as well Dave.
 
Baz .
dennis wake19/02/2009 21:24:21
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2044 forum posts
1451 photos
1 articles
hi ralph and all
     i have got  the record fosner bit set and i can use the largest bit in ether my piller dril or my hand drill this is just big enough to put the blank straight on to the chuck i use saving on time.
dennis
Ralph Harvey19/02/2009 23:37:14
3274 forum posts
315 photos
2 articles
Dennis
 
Thats sounds great, my bigest bit is not quite big enough, I have a core drill the right size but that only works if you go right through ?
 
Dave Look forward to it
 
Baz
 
It opens a lot of new doors for turning when you get used to the glue gun, I have herd of a cool melt glue gun any idea if they work or not ? 
 
Ralph
Doug20/02/2009 20:41:15
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3415 forum posts
35 photos
That`s a new one on me Ralph,
 
Wish i`d had one when i used to tile showrooms, the industrial hot guns don`t half smart if you get the glue from them on you. Much prefer my DIY gun.
 
Baz

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