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A quick guide to dust extraction

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phillip powell23/01/2008 20:35:00
45 forum posts
any recomendations? im after a fine dust extractor for routers etc. thanks phill
Woodworker23/01/2008 23:16:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Hi Phill, I use a Bosch GAS 50 which filters out all the nasty fine dust. I'd certainly recommend it. The most important thing is to go with an extractor with an effective fine dust filter.
phillip powell24/01/2008 16:27:00
45 forum posts
thanks ben
George Arnold06/03/2008 20:00:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos
Hi All  
I see in Axministers catalogue Dust Collection Grounding Kit how important is this in a small dust unit?
I know dust can self ignite given the right mixture of air and dust and static electricity.
Has any body had any experience with this?
George         
 

Edited By sparky on 03/09/2009 17:43:28

Keith Smith07/03/2008 11:42:00
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83 forum posts
5 articles

Hi George, as far as I know there has never been an explosion with domestic dust extraction systems. Now it is considered that grounding systems are not needed to prevent ignition from static discharge for domestic systems. It may prevent you getting a shock off the hose though if you fit one.

Personally I took mine out several years ago after I had a few blockages.

 Keith

Mike Garnham07/03/2008 11:51:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

George,

I've been extracting using a variety of systems for 25 years, often for many hours on end. I have never had any problems with static. I have occasionally noticed that dust will stick to the outside of a hose close to the pick-up of a table mounted router, but I doubt if anyone on this site has ever heard of a fire being started by static in dust extraction equipment at the domestic/hobbyist level.

Keith is right, anything in the hose will cause a blockage.

Mike 

Mike Garnham07/03/2008 11:53:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos
ps. In case you missed it previously, here's my home-made system:


/sites/5/images/member_albums/6440/dust_extractor_001_copy.jpg


/sites/5/images/member_albums/6440/dust_extractor_003_copy.jpg


Works a treat, cost pennies. Mike
George Arnold07/03/2008 18:16:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

Thanks  to all who answered, i'm going to fit some form of extraction, having ignored it for years, it's probaly closing the gate after the horse has bolted, but I have not given it to much thought in the past, but one or two remarks on the dust from yew and laburnam has brought it to my mind, I have  been looking at the Camvac range the spec says it filters down to 0.5 microns but it's not cheap best part of £200, I know you can't put a price on your health, Mikes idea looks interesting I wonder to what level it filters to . I suppose the type of vac you use will give the answer to that, the one I have is a Perform from Axminister, I see in their catalogue for some of the  cleaners they sell you can buy  a three stage filter, for fine dust and a quilted cloth one for MDF, I will have to contact them as I could not see it in the new catalogue, thanks agaian it will be interesting to see what other  people have to say " before the dust settles"

George 

Mike Garnham07/03/2008 18:46:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

George,

if you go for a version of my system, virtually no dust gets as far as the vacuum cleaner. That makes the question of filtering levels irrelevent.

Mike 

George Arnold09/03/2008 22:37:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

Thanks Mike

I had a look at your workshop pictures , I cant see much dust laying about ! it must work well. George

Olly Parry-Jones10/03/2008 12:07:00
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2776 forum posts
636 photos

I have a Record Power RSDE2-A. I like this extractor for its auto-switching feature, the fine filter (0.5microns) and also because with the 100mm hose, I can connect it up to my bandsaw when cutting MDF dust.

It is very noisy though and, perhaps a bit much for what you may need. Record Power also sell a smaller "power tool extractor" with a 32mm hose but, from what I've read, the general opionion is that the Trend power tool extractor is the one to buy. 

George Arnold10/03/2008 19:49:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

Thanks OPJ

Mike I have been looking at your set up I assume the vacuum attaches to the top of the box, there seems to be a baffle that hangs down to a shelf that runs the full length of the cabinet,or is this a filter, at the right hand end of the shelf underneath that looks like a ctoth filter by the way it hangs down at an angle,then on the underside there appears to be a baffle hanging down in front of the inlet tube, what provisions in the long shelf is there for air to pass through,? do you operate this on one machine at a time ,or is it piped round the shop, have you thought of any improvements i/e a bag to collect the   residue ? sorry for all the questions perhaps it not only the dust thats thick in my work shop

Thanks George

Mike Garnham10/03/2008 20:10:00
4114 forum posts
1 photos

George,

The vacuum does attach to the top of the box, and my thinking was to make the journey a speck of dust has to take from the "in" hose to the "out" hose (and thus to the vacuum cleaner) as long and circuitous as possible.

The horizontal shelf has a hole about 4 or 5 inches in diameter above the curved thing.......which is a piece of hardboard with probably fifty 3 or 4mm holes drilled in it. Standing on the shelf is another piece of wood with lots of holes. These holes don't act as filters in any way, they just cause turbulence which knocks the dust out of the air. Same with the baffle just in fron of the entry hose.

A bag inside wouldn't work (it would get sucked out of shape by the vacuum).......the only improvement I would make is to make the whole thing bigger.

I will start work shortly on another one on the other side of my workshop, which will do my new router table, the radial arm saw, and my planer. This will be bigger, and have a sort-of valve box to enable me to switch between the various tools without changing hoses over.

I forgot to mention.....the key feature of the box is that the door has got reasonable seals. A bit of foamy draught-strip will do. The system is so powerful that the chipboard door panel bulges in noticeably when the machine is on........if you make one, make it sturdy!

Mike 

Doug10/03/2008 20:22:00
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3415 forum posts
35 photos

Just a thought, if you can wait till i get chance to photo the dust deputy, it is so simple just a cone & a container. It would be so easy to replicate, no need for lots of baffles & holes.

Baz .

George Arnold10/03/2008 20:53:00
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1834 forum posts
191 photos

Thanks Baz and MIke

I.ll  give the project some thought, before I attempt my set up,

George

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