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Table saw

Setup

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Barry Jefferies30/12/2007 22:53:00
8 forum posts

Hi all.

I am fairly new to woodworking and have been gifted an old Startrite table saw. The saw is not cutting straight. I have checked the guide which seems to be at 90 degrees to the blade. When cutting the back of the blade (Side furtherst away from you) looks to be cutting into the wood on the guide side of the wood. I have had a look at the adjustment area of the blade, but as I don't know anything about setting up the saw I don't want to mess with it. Can anyone help me with this, or know where the closest place to Melrose (Scotish Borders) I can have this done.

Many thanks.

Barry.

Big Al31/12/2007 08:54:00
1602 forum posts
73 photos
Hi Barry Chances are it is your fence that needs adjusting, as the fence should be parallel to the blade. I am not familiar with the startrite, but on my table saw, sip 10" heavy duty saw, I have to slacken some screws near to where the clamping lever is, then swivel the fence until it is parallel, and then tighten the screws and check for parallel. I hope that this helps. Al
Oddjob31/12/2007 13:40:00
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1635 forum posts
79 photos

Hi Barry

I'm no expert on table saws but suggest you check first of all that the blade is parallel to the mitre fence guide slot in the table.  If not, then you will need to look under the table to see how you can adjust the blade alignment - usually by moving the bearings.  Then check the alignment of the rip fence as Al suggests.  When the alignment is ok, if the saw is still will not cut straight then it is probably the blade is blunt or in need of re-setting.  Sharpening and setting blades is not a job for the untrained - go to a saw doctor or, as blades are very cheap these days, buy a new general purpose blade.

Good luck 

derek willis31/12/2007 15:59:00
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2314 forum posts
1 articles

Barry,

to check the alignment of the fence to the blade, run a thinnish peice through against the fence, then, turn it end for end and run it aginst the blade though not cutting this time, if there is a difference you will need to adjust the fence, use this check proceedure whenever you need to check alignment.

D.

Barry Jefferies31/12/2007 22:20:00
8 forum posts

Many thanks to all for your replies and advice. I will use all your sudgestions and hopefully I will be able to sort out the problem.

Regards

Barry.

JohnMcM01/01/2008 16:43:00
134 forum posts
38 photos

Hi Barry, 

Unplug saw

3 steps

1  check blade is parellel to mitre slot. Use a combination square with body touching slot and ruler adjusted to just kiss a tooth at front of blade. Slide square along slot and check ruler touches same tooth (rotate blade to rear). If it is out the table top needs adjusting to bring it in. Don't know your saw but it is usually held by 4 bolts. Loosen just enough and tap side of table with mallet, recheck and tighten.

2  check rip fence is parallel to front and back of blade. They usually form a 'T' shape clamped at the front. Again loosen bolts and trial and error.

 3  check blade is at 90 degs to table. A plastic draughting triangle is ideal for checking, it must be clear of tooth. There is usually a stop bolt and lock nut to adjust if it's out.

Hopefully this article and video can explain more. Tablesaw tuneup

Cheers

John 

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