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Instructions

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Brian White09/09/2007 21:10:00
2 forum posts

Anybody up to date with the laws governing the instructions supplied with woodworking machinery?

At the beginning of June I purchased from Lyndhurst Woodworking a planer/thicknesser -same model but slightly cheaper than the Axminster AW 106 PT. The instructions supplied by Lyndhurst Woodworking were appalling and on phoning their office, it was suggested that I download the instructions supplied by Axminster for their machine ! With no other option, I did and used these instructions to set up my machine, but in my opinion this is a cop out by Lyndhurst and totally unfair on Axminster, who have taken the trouble (and absorbed the cost) of writing and supplying decent instructions for their customers. Had I known this I would have purchased the Axminster machine.

Anybody got any comments ? 

Woodworker09/09/2007 23:22:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Hi Brian, have you considered taking the machine back for refund?
Brian White10/09/2007 18:40:00
2 forum posts
There's nothing wrong with the machine - it works very well. I am curious to know, hence the question, if one Company with little or no integrity can legally operate using another Company's efforts to cover their own shortcomings.......
Woodworker10/09/2007 19:46:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Not sure about the legal side of things, but if I were in your position I would take the machine back on moral grounds, hence my earlier reply. From a personal perspective I would want to support the company who'd put the work in and I would also make an issue of this when returning the machine. If you want to find out more about the legal side, a quick phone call to citizens advice would be a good start.
Keith Smith10/09/2007 23:17:00
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83 forum posts
5 articles
I don't think there is anything illegal in this, not exactly good practice though.
terrychico54 Southerland11/09/2007 19:29:00
1 forum posts
do anyone have a step stool plans.
Woodworker11/09/2007 21:20:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Hi terrychico54, There will be links on the site to woodworking plans soon but in the mean time you might find what you're looking for at My Hobby Store: http://www.myhobbystore.com/GroupList/mcs/GroupID/1/GroupName/Woodworking%20Plans/v/1be3c241-4cf9-4bcc-a735-ceb506d98395 Hope that helps, Ben
Big Al15/09/2007 12:58:00
1604 forum posts
73 photos
Hi I think that lyndhurst machinery need to address the issue of appalling instructions and as you quite rightly state it is a cop out by lyndhurst machinery to direct you to axminsters web site. Personally i believe that no woodworking machinery should be sold to anyone that has little or no experience with woodworking machinery, and that machinery course should be made available to anyone wishing to purchase a machine. I am an apprentice served woodmachinist, and over the years have witnessed machinery being used dangerously, though luckily I have never witnessed an accident where somebody has lost a part of themselves. When I was an apprentice, one of the machinists, with over 30 years experience had an accident which resulted in him losing most of his fingers on his right hand on a surface planer. He also had 15 months of work as a result of the accident. I found this web site recently, and although it relates to table saws, and unfortunatly this saw is not available in the uk yet, it is a step in the right direction. Click on this link and have a look at the frankfurter video http://www.sawstop.com/how-it-works-videos.htm
Woodworker15/09/2007 15:50:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Hi Alan, I just watched some of the videos over at sawstop.com. What an incredible bit of kit, I hope they will be available in the UK at some point.
Steve Jones25/09/2007 14:37:00
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75 forum posts
37 photos

Hi ben,

Ijust watched the sawstop videos and am mightily impressed. Not only do I hope the saws make it to these shores but that the same technology is applied to chop/mitre saws aswell.

Woodworker25/09/2007 14:45:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
That's a good idea Steve! I wonder if the same technology could be adapted for use with planer thicknessers and spindle moulders etc...
Steve Jones25/09/2007 21:24:00
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75 forum posts
37 photos

Hi Ben,

I'm pretty sure that if the people/person who invented the sawstop could adapt it to any machinery woodworking or other wise. This subject is rather close to my heart at the moment as I had a mishap with the Dewalt mitre saw at my work!. The piece of timber I was cutting snagged the blade, the timber jumped throwing my left middle finger into the blade.I recon I was really lucky as I got away with a deep cut and a compound fracture. Anyway what surprised me was that the sawstop video suggested that us professional Woody's are more likely to get hurt than the hobby woodworkers, I suppose it must be down to those dear old statistics! Oh blimey there's a thought I've just added to them!!! Oh well happy woodworking Steve.    

Woodworker25/09/2007 21:34:00
1745 forum posts
1 photos
74 articles
Hi Steve, sorry to hear about your mishap, it can happen to the best of us! On the way to a full recovery I hope? I'm not surprised that pro's are more susceptible to injury for a couple of reasons: 1] When you use tools day in day out it's all to easy to forget just how dangerous they really are. 2] Pro's spend so much more time with power tools and machinery so I guess the odds are stacked up from the word go...
Matthew Platt26/09/2007 14:36:00
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347 forum posts
9 photos

The saw stop is a really fantastic idea, I shudder to think how many digits it may have saved already. 

Let's hope that the other power tool manufactureres recognise just what a potent selling point this is.

When you factor in how much you would be prepared to pay to have your fingers back after the event, it's still a bargain no matter how much it adds to the price. When it comes to professional firms employing people to operate their machines it makes even more sense.

Paul Laws27/09/2007 10:28:00
2 forum posts
Saw stop is a great idea apart from the fact that when it operates the component that stops the blade, an alloy block, is damaged and may need replacing. After replacing the damaged component the system needs to be tested to ensure that it will work when required but this will damage the said component again...I think the saw stop guys need to develop a system that stops when required and can be tested whenever the machine is to be used without causing damage to any of the safety devices components.

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