By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more

Workbench

Veritas plan

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
John Wills 118/05/2019 12:58:45
16 forum posts

I'm thinking my first project should be a workbench and browsing around an Axminster store a couple of days ago I came across Veritas plans for one. Are these any good? What are the alternatives?

Brian Barber21/05/2019 15:34:44
avatar
160 forum posts
244 photos

Hi John,

I built my own bench from scratch, have a look at my album New Workbench, gives some details of construction. I don’t use plans just build as I go along. Best thing about building to your own design is that you can make it to fit your available space and include features that you want. My main requirement was two front vices and a solid top that I could clamp on to all around the bench, also storage space. Best tip is to use solid wood (beech in my case, 40mm thick) kitchen worktops for the top of the bench. These are nice and flat and stay that way.

Brian

John Wills 122/05/2019 14:26:41
16 forum posts

Hi Brian,

Thank you so much.

Interesting work!

John

Zoe Potter23/05/2019 12:16:15
9 forum posts

A workbench is next on my list of things to make once I finish off a few DIY jobs.

Thanks for the tip Brian. I never thought to use a kitchen worktop and they are so cheap on ebay.

Julian03/06/2019 20:08:23
avatar
545 forum posts
28 photos

Hi John, A workbench is probably the most important item in anybody's workshop and a purpose made one will always be the best. Have a quick look at Paul Sellers You-Tube Site He has a couple of different benches on here all of which in my opinion are excellent and anyone can build them and modify them to their own needs and size.

Julian

John Wills 103/06/2019 23:38:32
16 forum posts

Hi Julian, thanks for information.

I’ll take a look

Regards

John

Zoe Potter24/06/2019 14:14:37
9 forum posts

Hi Brian,

I tried making my own workbench and like you I wanted some storage space underneath.

I'm going to put some solid beech doors under the workbench for storage. I was wondering if you used locking washers or screws with thread lock? The screws on one of my kitchen cupboards came loose at the beginning of this year. I want to ensure that this doesn't happen to my workbench cupboards. What would you suggest for holding the screws tightly in place and protecting them from vibration? External locking washers?

Regards,

Zoe

Brian Barber24/06/2019 22:23:47
avatar
160 forum posts
244 photos

Hi Zoe,

I have never had any problems with loose fitting screw on doors. The main thing is to use good quality brass hinges ( not the cheap brassed hinges) and good quality screws. Just make sure the correct size of pilot hole is used before fitting the screws, which should be really tight, no need to use any kind of thread lock in wood - usually this is only needed, sometimes, for metal nuts and bolts. My work bench suffers from plenty of violent vibration when in use but still no problem with loose fitting screws. Screws on kitchen doors can become loose since they are often made from chipboard which is not good at holding screws or nails.

Best wishes with your workbench construction, it would be nice to see a photo of it posted here,

Brian

Wilf.T25/06/2019 09:21:53
20 forum posts
2 photos
Hi Zoe,

To add to what Brian has offered. Use screws of a length the same as the thickness of wood you screwing into - NOT the ones supplied with the hinges. Screws of typically No7 gauge (or 3.5/3.8 mm)
Zoe Potter25/06/2019 13:03:03
9 forum posts

Thank you both for your tips. I've used the screws supplied with the hinges on a few things that I shouldn't have. I didn't want to buy 200 screws when I only needed a few. Now I'm using a local business that sell single screws **LINK**. I often collect parts to save on postage costs too. They don't sell hinges though, where do you get yours? Ironmongery direct?

Brian Barber26/06/2019 11:19:00
avatar
160 forum posts
244 photos

Hi Zoe,

Yes Ironmongery Direct are good but can be expensive. I usually just collect brass hinges wherever I can find them, Hardware stores, DIY stores etc so I have quite a useful collection. Same with screws, always buy boxes of 200 or so, they are useful always to keep in stock. Screwfix are good and also cheap.

Brian

Zoe Potter26/06/2019 15:03:55
9 forum posts

Thanks Brian.

Wilf.T29/06/2019 10:57:01
20 forum posts
2 photos
Zoe,

I'm sure you find boxes of screws more economical in the long run, I'll suggest a few to start with, a box of each (in Imperial then metric)?

1 inch No6 / 3x25mm (use for fine woodwork)
1? inch No7 / 3.8x30mm (Door and Window hinges)
1?inch No8 / 4x38mm (general purpose)

Try to buy screws that are not threaded to the head, if you do then you have to either clamp your work pieces together before screwing up or drilling a pilot hole that clears the thread in the material that the screw head will go ? otherwise when screwing up you will always have a gap and a loose joint; it?s known as ?ramp out?.

Then buy more No8 gauge sizes (2inch, 1? inch,) and/or 2inch No10 / 5x50mm as the need arises.

Buying screws loose or in cheapo pre-packs is false economy.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of The Woodworker incorporating Good Woodworking? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find The Woodworker inc Good Woodworking 

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Peter Sefton IMPROVE FAST LONG
Wood Workers Workshop
Triton
Felder UK April 2016
Transwave 2017
Chippendale
Tool Post
D&M Tools
Turners Tool Box
Tormek
D B Keighley
Subscription Offers

Subscribe to<br />    The Woodworker Magazine and receive a FREE gift

Contact Us

We're always happy to hear from you, so feel free to get in touch!

Click here to find who to contact