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Stanley Plane chip breaker re-truing

How to re-true or align the chip breaker

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John Blackie15/07/2016 19:14:25
40 forum posts
2 photos

I have a 2.3/8" Stanley (bench) plane. It's a lovely thing but the chip breaker is not right. I am looking for advice on how to fix it.

1. The chip breaker has been ground so that it is not square with the left or right thin edge of the plate. How should I true it up?

2. In truing it up it's likely that the part which presses onto the plane iron will need dressing. What angle should I dress it at? If you lay the chip breaker on a flat surface it touches that surface in two places only. At the business end and at the other end.

When it's looked at from the side should the flat on the business end lie at an angle to the flat surface it's touching? Or should it rather be at say 5-10 degrees to the flat surface? If yes to that, how do I grind the flat onto the business end to make what is effectively an undercut?

Any suggestions would be most welcome.

JohnB

ps I have taken some photos in an attempt to point to the angle I want to establish, but I've lost the transfer cable!

Ron Davis15/07/2016 20:11:29
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1614 forum posts
201 photos

The short answer is to leave it and look on ebay for a replacement, there is no need to grind the chip breaker ever!

My Record No5 1/2 was bought by my Dad in the late fifties and he gave it to me when I got married forty five years ago, I am on the third blade and the original chip breaker. I occasionally flatten the underside where it sits on the blade so as to stop shavings collecting between the blade and the breaker. They are bowed in manufacture and you can see this when you tighten the screw and the breaker and the blade come together.

They are not expensive to buy and should solve your problems

I have a Stanley Stay Set, which Clifton now make, given to me by my father in law ( I don't buy many planes!) and this has a two part chip breaker and this lies flat on the blade when it is held down by the lever cap.

Ron

John Blackie15/07/2016 22:20:19
40 forum posts
2 photos

Ron, I tend to agree. But the chip breaker I have has on the left hand edge end been ground off so that it does not touch the blade at that point. They are meant to touch the blade all the way across otherwise the blade will be bent out of true at that point and shavings will catch in it at that point.

I've seen one on ebay which is a refurb. It is pitted and clearly was pretty rusted before some one cleaned it up. I'll probably buy it since as you say it doesn't cost much. But I don't much fancy it.

When you say you occasionally flatten the underside where it sits on the blade - what I've called the business end - how do you do that? How do you prevent it curving along the width or going out of true (90 degrees) or rounding where it should have a flat surface?

Forgive my ignorance - what is a Stanley Stay set and where do I find one?

JohnB

Mike Jordan17/07/2016 10:04:46
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160 forum posts
17 photos

Hi John

You need to have the front edge of the chip breaker a perfect fit right across the width of the blade. You can test the fit by holding the two parts up to the light and looking through the raised section of the chip breaker, no light should be visible if you have it right. I have found that you can flatten the chip breaker mating face by using a flat oilstone, resting the mating face on the oilstone with the other end running on the bench or a piece of scrap material alongside the oilstone at a lower level. It takes careful work to do it and the stone must be dead flat.

The stay set cap iron was originally intended to allow honing of the cutter without resetting the position of the cap iron, just a small piece of the cap iron lifts off when the wedge is released. The drawback is that when removing the burr after honing you need to be careful not to rub the remaining piece of cap iron on the oilstone. They seem to work very well as a cap iron but I am unconvinced about any real time saving in use.

I've slipped from one term to any other above - cap iron and chip breaker are names for the same thing.

If this all reads like a foreign language, please sing out and I will try and post a photo.

Mike.

Mike Jordan17/07/2016 10:41:51
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160 forum posts
17 photos

All my album photos vanished some time ago so i thought I would try and rise to the challenge.

nb the bandsaw is not a vital part of this process.

I always polish the front edge of the breaker/cap iron to make it work smoothly.

Mike.

plane cap iron.jpg

Edited By Mike Jordan on 17/07/2016 10:44:07

John Blackie17/07/2016 11:36:39
40 forum posts
2 photos

Thanks Mike very much for both of your posts; the photo is a great help. It illustrates the problem I've found using this method which is the tendency to grind a curve onto the business face which one is trying to keep flat or rather straight! I think it needs a fence attached to the underside of the cap iron at right angles to its length and which rubs on the surface below and holds the whole thing's tendency to grind a curve.

I tried using the plane blade holder of my tormek grinder. With awful results - a huge chatter started and the stone will now need a lot of re-truing. I think this occured because of the nature of the steel of the cap iron.

Holding the fence onto the cap iron will now occupy me for a few days unless someone reading this has already cracked this nut and wants to share it with us all.

Thanks again Mike. I'm going to double check how flat my grind stones are. The sides are flat though!

JohnB

Mike Jordan17/07/2016 12:23:55
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160 forum posts
17 photos

Hi John. I think the sides of the stone are a very good idea. Mike

Ron Davis18/07/2016 20:33:07
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1614 forum posts
201 photos

Hi John, Mike has done a better job than I could in explaining what is needed, I will now go and polish my own chip breakers!

My plane was my father in laws and it has very little use. It has the 2 3/8th blade, and I think it was made from the late 1930's to the early 1960's as mine has rosewood tote and knob I believe it to be an early one as they used beech later on, there was a war on at the time.

As to where you get one, well ether pay up for a Clifton version or ebay, car boot sales could provide one but you will be very lucky if you find one as most people know the value of them.

Having said that I have a hundred year old Stanley No 7 which I got in poor state for £9, photo's of this are in my albums

Ron

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