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Steven14/09/2015 19:35:05
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Calling all professional, amateur & student woodworkers: fancy writing for your favourite woodworking magazine? We’d love to showcase your work & help you reach the masses! So why not email us now and show us what you’ve got? Who knows where it may lead! Email Group Editor Tegan Foley at tegan.foley@mytimemedia.com to find out more’

Derek Lane15/09/2015 15:53:41
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There are many talented people out there Steven. It is just getting them to put pen to paper so to speak

Mike Jordan01/11/2015 18:54:32
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I have written a number of articles for Good Woodworking in past years. I gave up submitting articles when a sliding sash window article was ruined by an alteration to my drawings which made nonsense of the article, a window made to the altered drawing would have been useless.

Imagine my surprise five years down the line when I noticed my name on an advert for the magazine, my articles are being used again without a penny being paid to me! If you do have a go please make sure that you don't sign the publication agreement but insist on a single publication in a single magazine only for a single payment.

To further assist you, should be paid a minimum of £100.00 per published page including all photographs, my second reason for moving elsewhere was the bright idea that contributers would in future be paid on a "per thousand words basis" and all photos would be used without payment. Times may be hard in the magazine game but using old copy to save money will only reduce the number of long term subscribers.

Edited By Mike Jordan on 01/11/2015 19:05:51

Mike Jordan01/11/2015 18:55:57
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I have written a number of articles for Good Woodworking in past years. I gave up submitting articles when a sliding sash window article was ruined by an alteration to my drawings which made nonsense of the article, a window made to the altered drawing would have been useless.

Imagine my surprise five years down the line when I noticed my name on an advert for the magazine, my articles are being used again without a penny being paid to me! If you do have a go please make sure that you don't sign the publication agreement but insist on a single publication in a single magazine only for a single payment.

To further assist you, should be paid a minimum of £100.00 per published page including all photographs, my second reason for moving elsewhere was the bright idea that subscribers would in future be paid on a "per thousand words basis" and all photos would be used without payment. Times may be hard in the magazine game but using old copy to save money will only reduce the number of long term subscribers.

sad sam02/11/2015 14:51:49
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Hi it will be very interesting to read the reply to mike Jordans comments

Tegan Foley02/11/2015 15:11:13
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Hi Mike, this is Tegan - I'm the new Group Editor on Good Woodworking and The Woodworker. I've just seen your forum post in relation to my post asking people to write for the magazine.

Firstly, I'm sorry to hear your drawings were altered therefore rendering the article incorrect. I do understand your frustration. Since I've started, I've introduced a process of sending all authors PDFs of their articles prior to publication. This will hopefully rule out the majority of errors creeping in, especially the more important technical and numerical ones.

Secondly, I'm sorry your article was used again without your permission.
I will make sure none of yours are used again, or at least not without prior permission being sought and a reuse fee offered.

As you rightly say in your post, times are hard for print publishing and unfortunately, I have a very, very small budget to work with. I'm constantly trying to look at ways to add value for the reader at the same time as producing a good a magazine as possible, but it's incredibly difficult. In an ideal world, all content would be brand-new and we wouldn't have to rely so heavily on archive material, but it's a constant struggle. It's not a case of saving money; it's a case of the money not being there and having to think of ways to use the budget in the most creative way possible.

I have had readers complaining about content being re-used and I agree that it does devalue the magazine to a certain extent. I will do my best to make sure archive material is kept to a minimum and will look at ways in which I can try and source new content while staying within the constraints of the budget.

I do appreciate your feedback and apologies again for the frustrations you have. I hope I have addressed your concerns and will do my best to try and improve the magazine as much as I possibly can.

Best wishes,
Tegan

Mike Jordan03/11/2015 11:29:15
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Hi Tegan

I understand that the quality of articles being submitted must vary greatly, but raising interest from possible contributors can surely only be done by advising them of rates and methods of payment for their work.

You have my sympathy in a difficult time for publishing, not least since I am certain that the bean counters will be squeezing your budget in what they see as their interests and leaving you with little chance of purchasing the material you need to sell the magazine.

I note that GMC seem to be killing off Plans & Projects and substituting a new title, presumably in the hope of raising interest from the woodworking public.

The massive amount of information, free plans, and "How to" on the internet must be an inescapable problem that we are all contributing to. A certain amount of recycling of old articles has always been part of magazines of all kinds. There are a number of my former magazine articles on the net put there by GW and others, no one can sensibly use them again without being caught out by the readers. Magazine editors are regrettably now being changed as frequently as football managers, similar problems have been obvious in the newspaper business for some time, I still take a local paper but most of the news is history by the time I read it because of local radio, TV, & internet.

Regards

Mike

Edited By Mike Jordan on 03/11/2015 11:30:33

Edited By Mike Jordan on 03/11/2015 11:33:06

Tegan Foley03/11/2015 11:36:21
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Hi Mike, I very much agree about your comments concerning advising authors, and this is something I will be doing, and have been doing, since I took over from Andrea. After all, having the contributors on our side is incredibly important to the magazine, and therefore essential - in my opinion at least!

Well, you've hit the nail on the head regarding budgets and yes, they are, unfortunately, ever dwindling. There are so many incredibly talented authors and woodworkers out there who I would love to approach but unfortunately there's no way we could afford them... so yes, thinking creatively and outside the box is an absolute must.

Yes, GMC killed off that mag quite a while ago. I think they're trying to appeal to a different audience now - perhaps the green woodworker - but the jury's out as to whether this will be a success. Good luck to them, I say; no doubt they are suffering similar problems to us.

Well, I plan to be here for as long as I can, and my aim is to grow and develop the magazine to the very best of my ability. The contributing editors on the magazine are amazingly helpful and supportive and we make a great team, and for that I am very grateful!

Fingers crossed we see a change soon; I have everything crossed!

Mike Jordan29/11/2015 12:15:51
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Hi Tegan

Further to our recent exchanges, I am happy to go along with the hope that things pick up on the magazine front and that interest in home woodworking returns. I have a feeling that the dearth of interest may in some measure be accounted for by the lack of practical subjects in secondary education. I am told that art, textiles, and cooking are now much favoured in schools rather than wood and metalwork, with some academies even abandoning and converting workshops to other uses. This goes along with an enthusiasm for calling any type of training an "apprenticeship" Five years learning a trade is certainly not the equivalent of twenty minutes being shown how to flip a burger and ask "do you want fries with that"
With luck this policy will lead to a shortage of tradesmen in future years with a corresponding increase in the value of the properly trained individual. I am frequently shown the work of spurious tradespeople these days so I think the day may be drawing near when people ask to see proof of training and competence.
I have looked at the front cover of the latest issue GW and find that you are doing a turning special, I can't see this as a good move since there are numerous magazines specialising in wood turning already on the market. If someone has paid a subscription for a woodworking magazine you would expect them to have selected one or the other. Youtube is also very well supplied with how to turn videos.
For my part, I intend to sit on the single article I have to hand, while waiting to see if anyone takes up the offer to appear in print for little or no payment.
As I previously indicated the publishers are in it for the rewards and so, quite reasonably, are the contributors.
Regards
Mike Jordan.

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