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Member postings for Jason Turk

Here is a list of all the postings Jason Turk has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: sedgewick planer thicknesser maintenance
08/03/2010 12:09:04
I have the sedgewick pt singing like a bird!
After adjusting the fluted and smooth rollers down 2mm from the cutting circle as per instructions, the timber was still needing a "helping hand" to travel through the machine, my last option was to clean and wax the table. Wow what a difference! Sometimes the simple solutions are the best. Would never believe that removing the tables natural friction would make such a difference, I barely made it to the other end before my timber appeared! I'd recommend cleaning and polishing to all pt users. (just don't tell her in doors)  Thanks for the help Marc. Now where did I put that camera?
03/03/2010 19:41:24
Thanks Marc, got in touch with sedgewick and they are sending me an instruction manual. It sounds like I have to adjust the springs to tension the "grabbing" roller, reasonably simple. Thanks once again. Jason.
26/02/2010 22:28:50
I have recently inherited an old sedgewick pt. I am wondering if anybody knows where I could find information on its maintenance. It seems to work well apart from the infeed "grabbing" roller which doesn't seem to be doing its job and the wood needs to be force fed, not a good idea I know. I would like some info regarding this point especially. Thought I would be very unmanly and try to find instructions before I take it apart and play with it! It seems very good quality and simply designed, a sedgewick advantage I believe, so hopefully I'll be up and running really soon. Surprisingly couldn't really find much on their website.
 
Thread: worksharp
13/02/2008 20:05:00

Hi Mick

your right, at that price, well worth investigating. Perhaps I'm just playing devils advocate, I'm sure they must have the wheel flat as this would be fundamental for this tool to perform its function. It also looked very portable and with little or no set up time would prove invaluable kept on the van for site sharpening as well as the workshop, I do find the Tormek a little bit of a handful and therefore it remains well and truly in the shop.

Regards, Jason.

13/02/2008 08:28:00

Hi Michael

I had a look at the website for the worksharp 3000. After watching the video ( http://www.worksharptools.com/pilot.asp?pg=ws3000vid) I agree it does look very impressive. When held up in a straight comparison with rival systems there are both good and bad points, I sometimes wonder if these guys create new tools/systems with emphasis placed on addressing issues with competitors systems, only to create there own problems.

I dream of the day when the ""perfect" tool is created, although we are all individuals with differing needs so it would be very hard to satisfy everybody. Until that time I guess we are left with our own individual needs and subsequent choice.

With regard to the worksharp, I like the idea of a flat top for flattening the back of the tool, the preset angles for honing the bevel are easy, but you lose the flexibility of say the tormek system that I use and once you move towards larger planer irons you will need to sharpen "free hand" on top of the wheel leaving an accuracy issue, unless you have a very steady hand of course. My major concern is that there appears to be movement in the wheel itself and when pressure is applied from the underside it appears to lift. (this can be seen quite clearly when the woodworker is invited to have a go at 3:55 in the video time line) Obviously until you have hands on experience using the system for yourself its hard to say if this would have any issue with sharpening, I merely wonder about the ability to hone the bevel consistently if the wheel is not flat and therefore not contacting the edge at all times. The vented wheel is an excellent idea though, being able to view the tool from the top as you sharpen would make sharpening curve tools like gouges an easy and enjoyable task.

Perhaps a review in GW would settle the debate.

Regards,

JT.

Thread: Worth the money
06/03/2008 07:35:00

Got to agree with Baz there!

As I said earlier though, its the customer who ultimately buys the tools, probably not best to inform them of this though. The wife would just stop talking to you for a couple of days whereas the customer might stop writing cheques, which would you prefer???

Remember it all comes off balance sheet and ultimately less tax to pay.

You should see my other halves face when I sternly ask, what would you rather, I buy the tools that allow me to do the job or give it too HMRC? Doesn't happen often, but shes speechless!

Jason.

02/03/2008 09:36:00

Baz,

Although it happens all of the time, any so called tradesmen that would take anothers tools, being that they are the thing that he earns his living with, should be strung up!!!

I know in some middle easten countries they chop of your hands for stealing. Try that with a saw stop table saw?

Talking of which, when will saw stop table saws make it to these shores?http://www.sawstop.com/  I wonder if they will ever license the technology to the big boys, or will they simply use something similar.

Once you see the saw stop demo video you wonder, in this day and age of extreme health and safety, why haven't the relevant authorities pushed this saw. Why haven't they worked with other manufacturers to produce nothing but these saws. I try to keep up to date with all aspects of tools and machinery, attending shows and trade days when ever possible, but it seems that all the manufacturers do is slightly improve on old technology, new fences, mitres gauges, cast iron this and that and other peripiral items. They shine and buff them, change a curve hear and a line there and then excitedly rave about the latest model. If the technology is there now to save many accidents why isn't it being implimented?

Sorry to go off track slightly, but this topic really grates with me, I have worked as a tradesman all of my life and I am fed up hearing the usual response, "thats the way we have always done it". I know that health and safety can be absurb at times but a persons health and safety IS very important, especially if you have a technology as meaningful as this one. Perhaps i'll start a new post, are you guys aware of the saw stop saws, I have been looking at them on the internet for many years and expected them to be hear by now.

Regards,

Jason.

01/03/2008 20:20:00

Hi Ben,

As a 75 owner your post makes me very happy. Can't wait to read you review. What do others think of guide rail saws against table saws for reducing stock and cutting up sheet material? As we have both stated, safer and easier. Pushing your hands towards a rotating blade or having it safely underneath you with both hands placed firmly on top with the saw, guide and board itself between you and the blade, no contest.

The one thing Festool need to address is cutting stock smaller than the distance between the clamping track on the under side and the anti chip edge, they need a rotating clamp to clamp at 90 degrees to the track. Check out the smart clamps for the ez smart guide, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrrjLYn-6WY I found it hard to believe that Festool are resting on there laurels on this issue, normally as you stated they are at the forefront of r & d. perhaps there is something special just around the corner, or perhaps you could bring it to there attention and bring some pressure to bear.

Regards,

Jason.

01/03/2008 19:47:00

Hi Paul,

 Congrats, you really did splash out!!!

Apologies for stating the old 2000 was made by trend, it was actually Freud.

I agree with Baz also, like I said work out which individual piece of kit you need and how often you will use it. I have the TS75 for cutting to size sheet & stock etc, but a dewalt 708 as my main mitre saw, a bosch 36 v lithium for big site drilling, a makita torque driver (how did we ever manage without them), a startrite band-saw, a sedgewick planer thicknesser and so on. I find the best piece of kit for the job regardless of price, if used often, and a good compromise if used infrequently.

Forget gimmicks, offset drill, never ever needed that, how many of us have fallen for an alluring tool with 3 outstanding features, one of which we actually use?

As you can tell I am no slave to name or colour, best kit for best application.

As I said originally you won't go far wrong with festool, but pick and choose, and remember, its the customer who ultimately buys the tools, so go on treat yourself only keep it under your hat!!!

29/02/2008 21:43:00

Hi Paul

Like every tool manufacturer you need to pick and choose and work out what you really need.

For instance if you do an occasional bit of random orbit sanding then do you need to spend a lot of money on a sander? Whereas festools range of guide rail plunge saws takes some beating and for me is worth £350 / £400 of anybodys money. I love the ability to take the saw to the work and not the work to the saw, safety is vastly improved and there is much less room required for handling large sheets. I know the table saw purists will be lining up to slate me but horses for courses, tell me the one perfect tool for every application and i'll buy 2!!! (Festool is sooo accurate too!!!)

Routers are quality with many unique features but pricey, they are about to lauch a new "big" router at long last. (trend made the last one)

One thing is for sure you will never be disappointed with a festool tool, the quality is obvious, but they do cost. I guess you get what you pay for. With the era that we live in with internet price comparisons and the like we all tend to get hung up on the price, we constantly want the cheapest, sometimes a bit extra spent is the right thing to do. Ask anyone who has run a lie nielsen plane over any piece of timber if the experience is worth the extra cash?

What sort of tools are you considering?

Regards,

Jason

Thread: Festool router/ Andy King
17/02/2008 21:09:00

Hi Andy,

Thanks for that. Thought it would be pricey.

Jason.

15/02/2008 18:58:00

Hi Andy,

Hopefully you'll see this. I was on the Festool stand on Sunday checking out the guide rail plunge saws and work table, and as I was running late with a long journey home I missed their new router. Silly really as I have thought for ages that the old 2000 was getting a bit long in the tooth and I never thought to ask the guys if there was anything new in the pipeline.

Quite by chance I ran into the festool guy in R&R in Cirencester on Friday and we got chatting and he mentioned they had a new router coming out in March/April.

I then discovered you talking about it from the show in another thread on the website. Did you get hands on with it? What did you  think? will there be a review in an up coming magazine?

Thanks

Jason

Thread: Chisels
14/02/2008 09:44:00

Rutlands have a chisel set on sale at the moment,

 http://www.rutlands.co.uk/cgi-bin/psProdDet.cgi/1310306 

Does anybody know of this brand? Is it any good? I hear alot about Japanese chisels, are they better? What are the better brands and where would you purchase them.

I have a reasonable Marple's set which I sharpen on my tormek 2006, they seem to sharpen well but ding very easily, although they do reside on the van and are given a reasonably rough life. I feeling I should invest in a quality set for the workshop alone, any suggestions fellow woodies?

Thread: worksharp
13/02/2008 20:05:00

Hi Mick

your right, at that price, well worth investigating. Perhaps I'm just playing devils advocate, I'm sure they must have the wheel flat as this would be fundamental for this tool to perform its function. It also looked very portable and with little or no set up time would prove invaluable kept on the van for site sharpening as well as the workshop, I do find the Tormek a little bit of a handful and therefore it remains well and truly in the shop.

Regards, Jason.

13/02/2008 08:28:00

Hi Michael

I had a look at the website for the worksharp 3000. After watching the video ( http://www.worksharptools.com/pilot.asp?pg=ws3000vid) I agree it does look very impressive. When held up in a straight comparison with rival systems there are both good and bad points, I sometimes wonder if these guys create new tools/systems with emphasis placed on addressing issues with competitors systems, only to create there own problems.

I dream of the day when the ""perfect" tool is created, although we are all individuals with differing needs so it would be very hard to satisfy everybody. Until that time I guess we are left with our own individual needs and subsequent choice.

With regard to the worksharp, I like the idea of a flat top for flattening the back of the tool, the preset angles for honing the bevel are easy, but you lose the flexibility of say the tormek system that I use and once you move towards larger planer irons you will need to sharpen "free hand" on top of the wheel leaving an accuracy issue, unless you have a very steady hand of course. My major concern is that there appears to be movement in the wheel itself and when pressure is applied from the underside it appears to lift. (this can be seen quite clearly when the woodworker is invited to have a go at 3:55 in the video time line) Obviously until you have hands on experience using the system for yourself its hard to say if this would have any issue with sharpening, I merely wonder about the ability to hone the bevel consistently if the wheel is not flat and therefore not contacting the edge at all times. The vented wheel is an excellent idea though, being able to view the tool from the top as you sharpen would make sharpening curve tools like gouges an easy and enjoyable task.

Perhaps a review in GW would settle the debate.

Regards,

JT.

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