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Member postings for Andy Brough

Here is a list of all the postings Andy Brough has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Workshop lighting
23/10/2008 13:10:00

Hi Albert

I too have fitted an anglepoise lamp between my woodturning and metal turning lathes and it is ideal inspite of all the overhead florescent tubes.  I did have all my electrical work inspected by an electrician and all was fine albeit that I had probably gone over the top slightly with safety....

Thread: Video - the Joint Genie system
08/02/2008 11:19:00

For joining planks edge to edge biscuits are probably better and quicker but for making carcases I find the Genie better when it comes to assembly.  The carcase does not slide around as when using biscuits and once pulled up the clamps can be removed and the result is usually square.  As replacements for mortice and tenons I find it brilliant and drilling two sets of holes is dead easy.  One problem I found was with over sized dowels splitting the end grain.  The big advantage of the Axminster 1m lengths is that so far, their size has been accurate, but if not it's an easy matter to lightly sand the whole length to a sliding fit. 

For biscuits I find that pocket screws help to pull the carcase square and together quite well and I have used them with the Genie but it won't pull up the joint easily as dowels need a good belt with a hammer! 

There is something pleasant about working with hand tools and the genie falls into that category as a cordless is quiet and unlike a biscuit jointer doesn't require a dust extractor and mask to use!

Andy 

07/02/2008 10:22:00

I bought the 6 and 8 mm combined set at a show for around £80.  The supplied drill bits are excellent German quality and drill clean holes.  I've not tried through dowels although I have bought a dowel plate to make my own but that's imperial as I use imperial bits in a router to make 'show' holes as the entry is clean. My intention is to fit face dowels in matching or contrasting hard woods whilst the working dowels are beech.  I have also enlarged genie made holes to use larger dowels which seemed to work as I didn't want to fork out for the 12mm version for one job!  Be careful though as the drill is sucked into the hole very rapidly. Looking at the site I bought an 8mm Craftsman set with the 6mm bar and drill for what must have been a very good price.  When I have finished the project I will have made 8 cupboard doors, two base cupboards, two top cupboards, a wooden chimney breast, large oak mirror and an oak fire surround all with no other joints except the dowels. I am impressed.

Andy 

06/02/2008 23:53:00

I have both run and been a partner in a manufacturing business I know the costs of bringing products to market.  The joint genie is not expensive within UK manufacturing abeit it would be cheaper from China.  Stainless steel would not be the correct material as it is hardened like a drill bush.  I have built several items of furniture using only this jig for all the joints and hopefully will be an article in GW when the whole project is finished.  I use Axminster's metre lengths of dowel and cut to size as required so I can be flexible and always have the right length available.  The ends are chamfered with a heavy duty pencil sharpener.  It is fast and accurate and I've not used my morticer or biscuit jointer since! One thing I would say is don't ever dry fit the joint as you'll never get it apart!

 Andy 

Thread: Chisels
03/02/2008 16:35:00

I recently bought the Sorby octagonal handled bevel edged chisels for cutting dovetails amongst other fine jobs and was very pleased with the quality.  They are very slightly concave by a few thou. but as bought they shaved the hairs off my arm before touching them up.  I particularly wanted the octagonal handles due to having a concrete floor! I would take up the offer and let us know how you get on.

Andy 

Thread: Workshop lighting
28/12/2007 17:39:00

Thank's Ben.  The common reaction is that no electrical work can now be done.  I recently had my lights and sockets all moved around in the lounge and dining room at considerable expense and was told at the end that I wouldn't get a certificate as the work didn't require it.  Modification of existing circuits in garages is allowed.  I was fortunate in that most of my wiring was done prior to the change and only extended since.  I do have the satisfaction of knowing and understanding the requirements and am competent to do it myself and indeed prefer to do so knowing it will be safe.  Unfortunately many workshops are totally inadequate for the power requirements of modern powerful machinery.  Large single phase induction motors on start up and sometimes even more on stopping demand huge amount of current.  Also people fail to take into account the distance from the meter where volt drop starts to play its part.  Modern motors will increase their current to compensate....Also out buildings should be on a separate circuit not on the houshold ring main as many are. 

A cautionary tell would be my then new planer which to comply with braking requlations the manufacturers employed massive electric braking to stop the motor within 10 seconds.  At the time it was located over 70ft from the meter and on 6mmsq cable still pulled so much current that the volts dropped and even more was drawn to the point that over years the windings melted.  The manufacturers soon fitted a mechanical brake....So even when you think you know what your doing an upgrade of machinery should always cause some reflection on the power supply.  My shop now has an isolator on the main feed to supply the planer and saw bench which are in effect connected straight to the meter regardless of whatever else is on.  It's only 40ft away now. An interesting execise is to add up all of your likely current consumption which could be on at once and add 10% for inductive loads.  Perhaps 5A per 1KW would be a good start.  It's surprising how it soon adds up.  If you're down the bottom of the garden then perhaps another 10 to 15% should be added for volt drop.  Ring main cable is an absolute no no. The minimum should be cooker cable at 6mmsq.  You should be now where near the cable capacity.

Much food for thought on this thread.  We discussed this at our wood turning club which made a few think....... 

27/12/2007 20:05:00

Hi Albert

I assume there is a consumer unit installed already and that it is supplied from the meter (household consumer unit) on its own circuit.  I used a 32A fuse and 6mm sq cable (10mm would be better) directly to the garage via a double pole isolator before it leaves the house as the garage is a separate building.  The electrician who originally wired it connected it from the household ring main.  The neigbour's  electrician fitted a proper consumer unit in his half of the garage (it's semi detached with mine) but left the feed connected to his ring main! The garage power circuit is a ring main with an upgraded fuse to 24A and 6A for the lights.  The two heavy current machines are fed separately but off the incoming main feed.  I've lost my links as my computer failed and I lost all my bookmarks but try: http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/consumer_unit_split_load.htm 

The great thing about doing it yourself, if you are confident and have the knowledge, is that you know exactly what you've got and can modify it as the need arises as it usually does in a workshop.  Lighting is a safe way to start. 

27/12/2007 12:23:00

Hi Albert

Tricky one this.  I recently moved my shop into the garage which did have power but was totally inadequate.  I did the job myself but one bit at a time as each wall/roof section was completed with insulation shelves etc.  There are several web sites that will give you all the wiring regs some with pics and even calculators that work out cable sizes for various distances from the supply.  I left the lighting until I was happy with the machine layout and even then tempory wiring was used to check out final position of tubes.  I did find some some superb small tubes that run cold and can be positioned in strategic places over machines and benches to provide task lighting.  I bought these from the Electric Centre (related to Plumb Centres) and cost less than £10 for 10w tubes and you can link them together to illuminate a long bench. These can cost £20 or so from places like B&Q and even off the net!

I also had rolls of original coloured cable........However I used to design electricity meters and know all about electrical connections and I've seen what some electricians have wired up!  Technically you can do it yourself and get the council to inspect it....If you are not sure Dennis's suggestion is best.  You do not need a certificate for lighting circuits as far as I know except for new circuits in bathrooms, kitchens and outside.

23/10/2008 13:10:00

Hi Albert

I too have fitted an anglepoise lamp between my woodturning and metal turning lathes and it is ideal inspite of all the overhead florescent tubes.  I did have all my electrical work inspected by an electrician and all was fine albeit that I had probably gone over the top slightly with safety....

Thread: Video - the Joint Genie system
08/02/2008 11:19:00

For joining planks edge to edge biscuits are probably better and quicker but for making carcases I find the Genie better when it comes to assembly.  The carcase does not slide around as when using biscuits and once pulled up the clamps can be removed and the result is usually square.  As replacements for mortice and tenons I find it brilliant and drilling two sets of holes is dead easy.  One problem I found was with over sized dowels splitting the end grain.  The big advantage of the Axminster 1m lengths is that so far, their size has been accurate, but if not it's an easy matter to lightly sand the whole length to a sliding fit. 

For biscuits I find that pocket screws help to pull the carcase square and together quite well and I have used them with the Genie but it won't pull up the joint easily as dowels need a good belt with a hammer! 

There is something pleasant about working with hand tools and the genie falls into that category as a cordless is quiet and unlike a biscuit jointer doesn't require a dust extractor and mask to use!

Andy 

07/02/2008 10:22:00

I bought the 6 and 8 mm combined set at a show for around £80.  The supplied drill bits are excellent German quality and drill clean holes.  I've not tried through dowels although I have bought a dowel plate to make my own but that's imperial as I use imperial bits in a router to make 'show' holes as the entry is clean. My intention is to fit face dowels in matching or contrasting hard woods whilst the working dowels are beech.  I have also enlarged genie made holes to use larger dowels which seemed to work as I didn't want to fork out for the 12mm version for one job!  Be careful though as the drill is sucked into the hole very rapidly. Looking at the site I bought an 8mm Craftsman set with the 6mm bar and drill for what must have been a very good price.  When I have finished the project I will have made 8 cupboard doors, two base cupboards, two top cupboards, a wooden chimney breast, large oak mirror and an oak fire surround all with no other joints except the dowels. I am impressed.

Andy 

06/02/2008 23:53:00

I have both run and been a partner in a manufacturing business I know the costs of bringing products to market.  The joint genie is not expensive within UK manufacturing abeit it would be cheaper from China.  Stainless steel would not be the correct material as it is hardened like a drill bush.  I have built several items of furniture using only this jig for all the joints and hopefully will be an article in GW when the whole project is finished.  I use Axminster's metre lengths of dowel and cut to size as required so I can be flexible and always have the right length available.  The ends are chamfered with a heavy duty pencil sharpener.  It is fast and accurate and I've not used my morticer or biscuit jointer since! One thing I would say is don't ever dry fit the joint as you'll never get it apart!

 Andy 

Thread: Chisels
03/02/2008 16:35:00

I recently bought the Sorby octagonal handled bevel edged chisels for cutting dovetails amongst other fine jobs and was very pleased with the quality.  They are very slightly concave by a few thou. but as bought they shaved the hairs off my arm before touching them up.  I particularly wanted the octagonal handles due to having a concrete floor! I would take up the offer and let us know how you get on.

Andy 

Thread: Pillar Drill
03/02/2008 16:27:00

Glad you like it.  Mine has never let me down.

 Andy

Thread: Box clamping jig
05/01/2008 20:33:00
Go for it!  My frame with its softwood 3x2 and the fact that it has a another rail 2/3 of the way up forming the drawer front rail which goes all the way round adds the the strength  of the bench.  Softwood is fine.  I did include a tool tray in fact two one at the left hand end and the other at the back.  Useful to push all the tools into to clear the top! Several layers of MDF with a ply cover would make agreat and cheap top.
05/01/2008 17:34:00
Talking of benches why not make your own?  Unless you spend a serious amount of money all the ready made benches I 've seen are not really sturdy enough.  I made mine in 1972/3 out of 3x2 soft wood with 32 mortice and tenon joints all the important ones pegged with dowels!  The components were made with hand tools in my bedroom at my parent's house and finally assembled at my girl friend's house.  It has 3 drawers for hand tools and two full depth shelves with doors to keep the dust out.  The top is two layers of 30mm ply with a 3x2 ash edge all around for the wonder pup and dogs.  Woodworkers vices are fitted at both ends and I use the Zlyss vice for most of my bench clamping requirements when normal vice or bench dogs don't work. It has served me well for all this time and you could stand a car on it!  I'm sure it would be cheaper than a cheap bench and very much better.
Thread: Traders get crafty
30/12/2007 22:44:00

Hi Steve

I make small items like boxes and woodturning for the club's craft stall but took a portfolio of work along with me to craft fairs and from this I got commissions based on the fact people liked the stuff on the stall and would trust me to make other items for them.   I only make furniture to order as I can't store anything!  I also take payment for the timber before I start. Getting stuff published in the magazines also helped! Good luck.

Thread: Pillar Drill
29/12/2007 20:03:00

Glad to be of help

Andy 

29/12/2007 16:33:00

The shop's called CSM and is owned by Tony Connelly in Rochdale tel 01706 342123.  His shop is like a club and his wife makes cups of tea!  We help to sell goods to others as we have all bought lots of stuff from him over the years. If you did ring mention my name as he know's me well!  He coolects mavhine tools, model engines and has a real jet engine plus a radial not to mention a cellar full of stuff.  Most of his customers are also eccentric like me who also builds model aeroplanes....

Andy 

29/12/2007 15:40:00

Hi Alan

No mine's a 12 speed manual with belt change which I don't do very often with wood but do if I drill metals.  It's easy to do.  Actually I was offered a metal working version which was too heavy to really be mobile but was still less than £200.  I was fortunate in that it was set up in the shop so I tested it before I bought it.  He is not cheap but you can try before you buy and is a real enthusiastic independant retailer.  The Record drill press is probably the best albeit made abroad these days.  You could try a second hand Meddings of Fobco but they are often 3 phase and it will still cost more than a new Ryobi.   No, I'm very happy with the Ryobi inspite of its being made in China. 

Andy 

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