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Member postings for Steve Jones

Here is a list of all the postings Steve Jones has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Welcome to the turning section
22/04/2008 17:52:00

Hi Tom,

The CL1 is a good Lathe, and if your  going to take up turning seriously then go for it. But if youv'e never turned any thing in earnest before then I'd visit either a dealer demo day or a woodworking show where you can try before you buy. And join your local wood turning club who will be happy to help.

But the best bits of advice I can give to you ( and I was told this) is

  1. Get your self enrolled on a wood turning course, there is nothing better than being taught by a pro from the start as this way you don't pick up all those nasty habits that form if you try to teach your self. And you will find out if turning is for you before you spend a lot of money!
  2. However I would also purchase the late and great Keith Rowley's book and DVD called Wood turning a Foundation Course,  this in my humble opinion has got to be the wood turners bible.      

Hope this has helped a bit, hope you enjoy wood turning, best of luck.

Stevie

Thread: Time for a new PC Chair
19/04/2008 20:59:00

Hi Woodchip,

Just got a message from Mike Garnham about your requirement for spindles. I'm not a production turner I wouldn't even call my self semi pro even, but if you live anywhere near the Wirral I may be able to help. I've just posted some photo's of a project that I've just finished if your interested, Just give me a shout.

Stevie

Thread: Wood suitable for food bowl?
16/04/2008 20:07:00

Hi Felicity,

The first thing I'd have to say is definitely sign on to a wood turning course, and secondly I'd go for either Sycamore or Beech. These two woods are both native and are what is commonly used for kitchen utensils and cutting boards. Good luck with the turning I enjoy it immensely and I hope you will too.

Regards, Stevie  .

Thread: pen making
27/01/2008 22:08:00

Hi John,

Any good quality and SHARP drill bit will do the job, but if you can get to a home base store have a look at the bullet point drill bits, I think they are probably the ones I'll be going for next time I am buying drills. One more tip Is to keep the drill bit clear by drilling a little then withdrawing the bit to clear the chips then drilling a little more etc. This will stop any heat build up in the blank as well as keeping the bit from wandering.  Hope this helps, best of luck Stevie .

Thread: Creative Woodturner
21/01/2008 22:05:00

Hi all,

    Just had a look at the new Creative woodturner site and downloaded the latest version. You can now try it for free for 10 days! I use the software all the time and find it really good, I can't recommend it enough. The new site is also going to include a face book type section where photo's and video's can be sent, sounds interesting.

Thread: Which lathe?
24/12/2007 17:41:00

Hi Albert,

I would look out for a reputable make, preferably one still in production or one you can still get spares for, i.e. Axminster or record e.t.c.

Bestwishes,

Stevie.
21/12/2007 19:33:00

Evening Albert,

I would recommend looking through the Turners Retreat, Craft Supplies, or the Stiles and Bates Catalogues/websites for live centers. My personal choice would be the Robert Sorby Deluxe center as you can add various upgrades as you need them.

Happy Turning,

Stevie.

20/12/2007 22:16:00

Yes a live center makes turning a lot easier, the center has a bearing in it so it spins freely. I have used both and won't be going back to using a dead center.

Stevie.

20/12/2007 21:36:00

Hi Albert, I too have bought the DML36SH-MK2 I got mine some 18 months ago. I can't fault it, I also bought a Record live tail stock center and it does make a big difference. I also bought a Record spindle and bowl turning set of tools, if you can afford to buy them all together try to squeeze a deal out of your dealer.Something else you'll need is a bench grinder preferably with a wide white wheel, also on the subject of sharpening your tools the Robert Sorby grinding jig or something like it is a must. Hope this info helps, good luck and have a Merry Christmas,

Stevie

Thread: P.U.glue.
20/10/2007 23:04:00
Hello Gavin, I just tried Googling PU adhesive and it turns out it can be quite nasty stuff. You can get occupational dermatitis, using nail varnish remover will strip the oils from your skin, its flammable you certainly don't want it in your eyes.Apart from that its very good at doing its wood sticking job. Steve.
27/09/2007 19:24:00
Hi Andy, you and me both. I think sometimes you just get ahead of your self in keenness to get a project glued up. I know I do even though the gloves are sitting on the bench!By then it's usually to late!! As you've found out hot water,soap and a good quality Pumice stone are the only way. That and a little more haste. Happy woodworking Steve.
Thread: Welcome to the turning section
24/09/2007 23:02:00
Best of luck Andy, as a relative newcomer to woodturning (18 months and counting) my self I know your in for a treat! And being tutored by Dave Roberts you lucky chap.I think it's a pretty steep learning curve,Ive been under the wing of Ray Jones from Liverpool(KnottyAsh would you belive),the dig ins  and catches  where a plenty to start with and the pile of shavings was vast. But under Rays patient tutelage the pile of shavings and the catches are getting less.I hope the same goes for you, and that you enjoy it as much as I do! Best of luck, can't wait to read about your exploits in G.W. Keep those bevels rubbing,...Steve. 
22/04/2008 17:52:00

Hi Tom,

The CL1 is a good Lathe, and if your  going to take up turning seriously then go for it. But if youv'e never turned any thing in earnest before then I'd visit either a dealer demo day or a woodworking show where you can try before you buy. And join your local wood turning club who will be happy to help.

But the best bits of advice I can give to you ( and I was told this) is

  1. Get your self enrolled on a wood turning course, there is nothing better than being taught by a pro from the start as this way you don't pick up all those nasty habits that form if you try to teach your self. And you will find out if turning is for you before you spend a lot of money!
  2. However I would also purchase the late and great Keith Rowley's book and DVD called Wood turning a Foundation Course,  this in my humble opinion has got to be the wood turners bible.      

Hope this has helped a bit, hope you enjoy wood turning, best of luck.

Stevie

Thread: Head Board in Ash
20/04/2008 15:12:00

Glad you like it.

100% impovement, the original was an awful wrought iron look alike thing

19/04/2008 21:04:00

Hi Mike,

Just posted Woodchip a message, sounds like the kind of project I like. Also the I.A.M. stands for the Institute of Advanced Motorists or in my case Motorcyclists.

Stevie

Thread: Time for a new PC Chair
19/04/2008 20:59:00

Hi Woodchip,

Just got a message from Mike Garnham about your requirement for spindles. I'm not a production turner I wouldn't even call my self semi pro even, but if you live anywhere near the Wirral I may be able to help. I've just posted some photo's of a project that I've just finished if your interested, Just give me a shout.

Stevie

Thread: Head Board in Ash
19/04/2008 20:15:00

Hello, just got round to badgering the missus into taking a couple of photo's( I'm not allowed to use the new camera as they seem to break when I use them!).

Anyway, this project was originaly just an exercise in copy turning at night school. But as the headboard that came with our bed was naff I thought it would be a good idea to put into practice what I'd learnt and make something useful.

Stevie

P.S. The other photo's of some of the details are in my gallery pages. 

Thread: Wood suitable for food bowl?
16/04/2008 20:07:00

Hi Felicity,

The first thing I'd have to say is definitely sign on to a wood turning course, and secondly I'd go for either Sycamore or Beech. These two woods are both native and are what is commonly used for kitchen utensils and cutting boards. Good luck with the turning I enjoy it immensely and I hope you will too.

Regards, Stevie  .

Thread: Whisky Table in Ash 5
01/04/2008 19:35:00

Its me again,

To answer your question yes they are sliding dovetails. I first made a jig to go over the bed of my bench mounted Record lathe and locked the index ring on the chuck. I then used a 1/2" router with the 30 mm collet fitted and a 3/8" straight bit to remove the majority of the material. I then used the dovetail bit to clean out the housings. I also had to make a holding jig so as I could route the sliding dovetails on the legs on my "Norm Abram special "router table.

I get a lot of enjoyment from making the jigs and problem solving as well as making the project, although some times it gets a bit frustrating if it doesn't go right. These days I make a prototype to test out the jigs first!!! 

Regards

Stevie

Thread: Mini Table
01/04/2008 19:18:00

Dear OPJ,

 I have been turning for 2 years now, the Charnwood mini lathe that I used to turn the mini table is my second lathe, its a lot more portable than my Record lathe. A chap at my wood turning night school bought the Charnwood Midi lathe that your looking at and I think that I would probably go for the Record lathe. 

 Stevie. 

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