The Woodworker cover image for September 2015Welcome

Let’s face it, we all enjoy our woodworking, and most of us will rarely pass up the chance
to learn something new. But what if it’s us that’s doing the teaching? The two are actually very similar sides of the same coin. Anyone who has had the chance of imparting
some useful knowledge to a keen and eager audience will no doubt appreciate that it’s something of a privilege. Not only will you feel a warm glow of helping others along a
sometimes rocky road (with the additional satisfaction of showing them your own particular way), but you will soon realize that it’s a two-way street. There’s plenty that comes back.


Alternative routes

I’m continually surprised at the ingenuity of the average student when it comes to interpreting even a fairly basic task, and it would be a fool who would ignore an impressive innovation, however unconventional. Let’s face it: there’s always more than
one way to complete the same task, and as long as it’s safe and gets the job done, well, that’s fine by me. But it’s not just a new take on an old technique that you may pick up, with no shortage of new ideas out there; it won’t be long before the teacher is learning as much as the student.


Sharing around

Many are the recent times that my eyes have been opened to new designs, and there seems to be a greater spirit of generosity abroad these days when it comes to encouragement and sharing around. One of the really good points though is one that’s harder to define, but is possibly of greater long-term benefit than just acquiring a new technical wrinkle or admiring a new curve combination.
If you’re lucky enough to be working with young people, then there’s every chance to share in the new spirit of joi de vivre that currently abounds amongst this latest generation. They’re full of positivity and tolerance, and we can all learn from them and maybe do our own small bit to help improve the rest of our time here.


Summer breaks

At this time of the year there may be other sun-related distractions out there, but don’t forget the important part that you and every other reader plays in this ever growing
woodworking family of ours. Yes, if there’s any subject you’d like covered or projects you’d like to see (or even stories of woodwork past and present), just drop me a line and we’lldo our utmost to accommodate you. Lastly, don’t forget about our Marketplace page. If you’re having a clear-out – and most of us are long overdue on this front – this is the best (and cheapest, because it’s free) form of advertising out there. And you can also be sure that your surplus stuff will be going to a good home!

Mark Cass, Editor