The Woodworker, February 2017

Robin Gates makes a pair of heart-shaped bowls using sycamore
Robin Gates makes a pair of heart-shaped bowls using sycamore

Welcome to our February issue, which contains the usual eclectic mix of projects for all skill sets, technical articles to help broaden your horizons and a wide range of tests within our ‘Kit & Tools’ section’. We also have a special feature for you this month, which announces all the winners of the 2016 Wood Awards. Unveiled at the end of last year, at a ceremony held at Carpenters’ Hall in London, we look at all the winners across all 12 categories, with our cover star this month being the Stihl Treetop Walkway, which won gold within the Commercial & Leisure category.  
In terms of projects for you to make, Robin Gates falls for the charms of sycamore, carves heart-shaped pots from a log and makes knives for green woodworking from an old saw; Dominic Collings uses oak to give his piano new life, and Alan Willey combines ply, solid timber, and a touch of pragmatism to make a very practical offset chest of drawers. In turning, Peter Vivian is tasked with producing a gavel and accompanying sounding block to be used at a meeting to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the ‘Sixty-Six’ Club; Colin Simpson creates an emerging bowl, and Ralph Harvey’s trinket box combines turning with cabinetmaking.

Rick Wheaton shows how to make your very own £25 soil-pipe steamer
Rick Wheaton shows how to make your very own £25 soil-pipe steamer

In techniques, inspired by a recent steam-bending course held by Charlie Whinney, Rick Wheaton sets about making his own £25 soil-pipe steamer and uses it to create a stylish fruit bowl, and after 20 years in his former workshop, Peter Bishop decides to up sticks and downsize to a smaller working area – he shares the story with us here. And as Bob Chapman discusses, being aware of the plethora of safety considerations and practices before you start turning will stand you in good stead for an injury-free and happy journey.

The Editor takes a closer look at the Triton TWSS10 250mm wetstone grinder
The Editor takes a closer look at the Triton TWSS10 250mm wetstone grinder

In ‘Kit & Tools’, we have a varied selection of tools and machines that will make your woodworking life easier, starting with the Editor’s review of the Triton TWSS10 250mm wetstone grinder. Ideal for cabinetmakers, joiners, turners and carvers, it will certainly prove to be an asset for every workshop. Andy King also tests the Festool ETS EC 125/3 EQ sander and as he says: “Festool have hit the nail on the head with this palm-style random orbital that delivers on many different levels.” He also discovers that with most things in life, it pays to go for quality, and this is proved when he looks at a new fret saw from Knew Concepts, which produces excellent results while being light in weight and very easy to control in use. Phil Davy is also impressed with the Ryobi R18ALF 18V folding area light, which allows you to work with both hands in a clearly lit environment - a very illuminating discovery!

Fancy winning a Hammer A3-26 planer/thicknesser worth over £3,000?
There’s still time to enter our Felder competition - you could be the lucky recipient of a Hammer A3-26 planer/thicknesser worth over £3,000!

There’s still a few weeks left before our Felder competition draws to a close, so do ensure you send over your entries before 17 February. Whether you’ve made a new piece of furniture or are submitting a previous project, click here to find all the details you need to know regarding entry. There’s some truly fantastic kit up for grabs, and a chance to have your work judged by one of our expert panel. Good luck to all!

As well as all this, we also have your usual favourite pages, including our timber suppliers directory, readers’ letters, AOB, archive and marketplace.

All this and much more in the February issue of The Woodworker, which is now on sale!