Les Thorne’s wonderful skeleton clock with finials is made using ash and ebony
Les Thorne’s wonderful skeleton clock with finials is made using ash and ebony

Our August issue is here and we’re confident it’s going to be a hit with our readers. As we make our way into summer, we provide you with some great project ideas, which will make sure you’re kept busy in your workshops. This month’s cover star and also our first project is Janice Anderssen’s step stool & toolbox in one, which although simple, will make a handy addition to any workshop, and you also get two projects for the price of one, which is always a bonus! For those of you who are fans of making the most of waney edges and natural character, Peter Harrison’s rustic wine rack will definitely appeal. Made using oak and yew, it houses at least 12 bottles and is designed to be either placed inside a cupboard or used freestanding. Mike McCrory joins us again, but this time is faced with a tall order as he is commissioned to make a bespoke growth chart, which is not only beautifully hand-crafted, but also visually appealing and entirely functional. Another great workshop project is Phil Davy’s handy sanding storage solution, which ensures that all your abrasives are kept in one place - just as long as you remember to put them back after you’ve finished! Our last project is worth waiting for, and that’s Les Thorne’s stunning skeleton clock with finials, which is finished using ebonising lacquer and gilt cream, to create a wonderful contrasting effect.

Poor man’s marquetry: Dave Roberts found making repair patches for the gable end of the Old Vic’ oddly satisfying
Poor man’s marquetry: Dave Roberts found making repair patches for the gable end of the Old Vic’ oddly satisfying

In our technical section, Dave Roberts returns with the next instalment in his ‘What the Dickens’ series. With work on The Old Vic’s sash window looming on summer’s horizon, he takes a timely lesson in compromise. Peter Bishop also brings us the next in his ‘Understanding timber’ series, where he moves on to looking at the next phase in the process: harvesting timber ready for conversion. We also have the last in David Moody’s ‘Woodworking adventures’, where he shows you that no matter what the budget or resources available to you, anyone can make their own tools and experience the joy and satisfaction that goes alongside this.

Milwaukee’s impressive new double compound 250mm blade pullover mitre saw
Milwaukee’s impressive new double compound 250mm blade pullover mitre saw

In ‘People & Places’, Edward Hopkins’ blow-by-blow guide takes the fear out of framing; we take a closer look at the process of making one of Marjan van Aubel and James Shaw’s ‘Well Proven Stools’; Andy King jets off to Berlin find out what new developments Milwaukee have up their sleeves; and in ‘End-grain’, we ask if the projects you make demonstrate spontaneity.

Pen turning type work is an ideal application for the Axminster AT1016VS lathe
Pen turning type work is an ideal application for the Axminster AT1016VS lathe

There’s a varied lot of kit on the test bench this month, starting with the great Axminster AT1016VS lathe, which would suit any professional or serious amateur turner. Featuring an excellent variable-speed range it is very well made and the digital readout is a handy addition. Of course, any new lathe requires a good chuck, and the Axminster Woodturning Starter Kit SK100 chuck package is a great one to go for. Ideal for those new to turning and containing everything required to get you up and running and turning to your heart’s content, this package features a stainless steel construction and is presented in a sturdy storage case. If you’re in the market for a pair of new drills then the Milwaukee M12PP2A 12V Fuel twin kit will certainly appeal. While they are compact, light in use and extremely powerful, they may also change the way you look at 18V tools. But if carving is more your thing, or if you’re a budding whittler, then Stubai’s five-piece chip carving set would be a great place to start. offering great value for money, the tools are all of a solid construction and they are suitable for a variety of applications. Phil Davy also takes a look at the Mirka Aros cordless sander, which is certainly a great piece of kit, although probably more suited to the professional workshop due to its fairly high price tag.

And to top it all off, we also have a great competition that gives you the opportunity to win an Axminster Hobby Series HBS200N bandsaw - worth over £185. Perfect for the small workshop or hobby user, this excellent bandsaw could be yours, so pick up a copy of our August issue to find out how you can enter - good luck!

Enjoy!
Tegan Foley, Editor