By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more

Member postings for Mike Jordan

Here is a list of all the postings Mike Jordan has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Acorn Smoothing Plane
07/08/2017 20:13:03

I remember Acorn tools being on sale in the 1960s they were reputed to be of a slightly lower quality than the big names but with no obvious major difference in appearance. The price sounds good and the pics show a tool which should clean up nicely. A nice souvenir of your holiday!

Thread: Water Mill Pics
25/07/2016 19:20:31

Hi Ron. No that's the country residence of a very elderly moggy. He's down to his last few teeth so not much of an attack risk.

Mike.

25/07/2016 19:13:02

Thanks Derek. It was a make it up as you go job so there are no plans of any kind. It started out as a promise to make a waterwheel and gathered a few embellishments along the way. There is a small solar panel on the back left corner which lights up the inside after dark, it's given everybody a few laughs and does work surprisingly well. The axle of the wheel extends right through the building and a plastic cam works the figures. It still lacks a few finishing touches but I will sort it during the winter when I take it in out of the weather.

25/07/2016 12:27:30

In a previous post I said that all my pics had disapeared, glad to say i was wrong so here are some.

Wasted mega man hours making this - one figure irons constantly while drinking tea while the other pushes the same piece of timber through a machine all day. All driven by the wheel.

If time ever allows the woodworker may get a rocking chair instead.

Now I intend to look at posting a video!

 

 

water mill 003.jpgwater mill 002.jpgwater mill 001.jpg

Edited By Mike Jordan on 25/07/2016 12:29:03

Thread: Stanley Plane chip breaker re-truing
17/07/2016 12:23:55

Hi John. I think the sides of the stone are a very good idea. Mike

17/07/2016 10:41:51

All my album photos vanished some time ago so i thought I would try and rise to the challenge.

nb the bandsaw is not a vital part of this process.

I always polish the front edge of the breaker/cap iron to make it work smoothly.

Mike.

plane cap iron.jpg

Edited By Mike Jordan on 17/07/2016 10:44:07

17/07/2016 10:04:46

Hi John

You need to have the front edge of the chip breaker a perfect fit right across the width of the blade. You can test the fit by holding the two parts up to the light and looking through the raised section of the chip breaker, no light should be visible if you have it right. I have found that you can flatten the chip breaker mating face by using a flat oilstone, resting the mating face on the oilstone with the other end running on the bench or a piece of scrap material alongside the oilstone at a lower level. It takes careful work to do it and the stone must be dead flat.

The stay set cap iron was originally intended to allow honing of the cutter without resetting the position of the cap iron, just a small piece of the cap iron lifts off when the wedge is released. The drawback is that when removing the burr after honing you need to be careful not to rub the remaining piece of cap iron on the oilstone. They seem to work very well as a cap iron but I am unconvinced about any real time saving in use.

I've slipped from one term to any other above - cap iron and chip breaker are names for the same thing.

If this all reads like a foreign language, please sing out and I will try and post a photo.

Mike.

Thread: Good Woodworking wants your help!
24/05/2016 07:28:14

I thought we covered this some weeks back with Tegan! In short, magazines are expensive, no one wants to pay for blatant repeats of articles, and if you don't pay the writers you won't get quality material to use. If it's not a unique design or something new, it's already on the net with a video showing how it's done. The furniture I formerly made is now imported from China at unachievable prices so perhaps no one can be bothered to make their own.

Thread: Building Our Own Shepherd Hut
03/05/2016 17:03:52

MHi Al

I suggest you have a good look at the commercial versions and pick up a few ideas. They seem to vary in construction over a wide range. I've seen them clad with cedar boarding, match boarding, and wriggly tin with a plastic finish. I don't think you should worry about spending on materials! The ready made versions I looked at were priced from £17,000 to £25,000 seems a lot for a rather posh garden shed on wheels.

Thread: Thickness / Planer problem
17/04/2016 18:08:03

Hi Mike. All the thickness planers I have seen have been fitted with adjustable tension springs which pull the rollers down onto the timber. These are viewed from the underside and have a pair of locking nuts to allow the tension to be adjusted. My Sedgewick makes the marks you mention, particularly in softwood but they need only about half a mill off to remove them. It sounds as if your machines rollers are a little to tight. If the rollers are not adjustable I suggest that you use a trial piece to set the thickness before passing your material through at finished size.

Thread: Best timber for gates
26/01/2016 08:37:19

Hi Jeremy If you prefer to use softwood and make a saving, I suggest you have a look under the "articles" heading at the top of the page and look under outdoor projects for an article on making a stable door. This contains a section on a method called painting together, this is a rather old fashioned but effective way of making your external joinery last longer.

 

Mike.

 

 

Edited By Mike Jordan on 26/01/2016 08:38:43

25/01/2016 17:00:35

Hi Jeremy

As suggested, Iroko is ideal. I have some garden furniture in iroko which is over 20 years old, has spent all that time standing on a soggy lawn and getting neglected. Still no sign of rot! The drawback is the need to glue joints in iroko with epoxy glue, the oil content of the timber prevents many commonly used glues getting a grip.

There is nothing wrong with the suggestion of using treated timber but i do worry about breathing in the dust from this during the making. If the chemical content kills off bugs and rot spores it can't be good for you and I.

Mike.

Thread: sliding compound mitre saw problems..
25/01/2016 16:45:06

It looks much the same fault that can occur with a radial arm saw if the blade is not exactly parallel with the arm of the saw. In that case just a fraction out of track will tend to cause a burn mark on the end grain.

My problem with this diagnosis is that a radial arm saw is usually fitted with a motor head that is designed to rotate through 90 degrees when required but I havn't seen a sliding chop saw with a rotating head.

It looks as if the blade is not parallel with the bed bars in your case. If the angle of the head is not adjustable then it would be a good idea to look at the pivot bolt that allows the blade to rise and fall, or any other part of the saw that can allow the blade to move out of track.

A dial gauge is what I use to check my RA saw but the photo seems to show a deviation which should be visible using a square from the fence.

Mike.

Thread: A message from Get Woodworking
29/11/2015 12:15:51

Hi Tegan

Further to our recent exchanges, I am happy to go along with the hope that things pick up on the magazine front and that interest in home woodworking returns. I have a feeling that the dearth of interest may in some measure be accounted for by the lack of practical subjects in secondary education. I am told that art, textiles, and cooking are now much favoured in schools rather than wood and metalwork, with some academies even abandoning and converting workshops to other uses. This goes along with an enthusiasm for calling any type of training an "apprenticeship" Five years learning a trade is certainly not the equivalent of twenty minutes being shown how to flip a burger and ask "do you want fries with that"
With luck this policy will lead to a shortage of tradesmen in future years with a corresponding increase in the value of the properly trained individual. I am frequently shown the work of spurious tradespeople these days so I think the day may be drawing near when people ask to see proof of training and competence.
I have looked at the front cover of the latest issue GW and find that you are doing a turning special, I can't see this as a good move since there are numerous magazines specialising in wood turning already on the market. If someone has paid a subscription for a woodworking magazine you would expect them to have selected one or the other. Youtube is also very well supplied with how to turn videos.
For my part, I intend to sit on the single article I have to hand, while waiting to see if anyone takes up the offer to appear in print for little or no payment.
As I previously indicated the publishers are in it for the rewards and so, quite reasonably, are the contributors.
Regards
Mike Jordan.
03/11/2015 11:29:15

Hi Tegan

I understand that the quality of articles being submitted must vary greatly, but raising interest from possible contributors can surely only be done by advising them of rates and methods of payment for their work.

You have my sympathy in a difficult time for publishing, not least since I am certain that the bean counters will be squeezing your budget in what they see as their interests and leaving you with little chance of purchasing the material you need to sell the magazine.

I note that GMC seem to be killing off Plans & Projects and substituting a new title, presumably in the hope of raising interest from the woodworking public.

The massive amount of information, free plans, and "How to" on the internet must be an inescapable problem that we are all contributing to. A certain amount of recycling of old articles has always been part of magazines of all kinds. There are a number of my former magazine articles on the net put there by GW and others, no one can sensibly use them again without being caught out by the readers. Magazine editors are regrettably now being changed as frequently as football managers, similar problems have been obvious in the newspaper business for some time, I still take a local paper but most of the news is history by the time I read it because of local radio, TV, & internet.

Regards

Mike

Edited By Mike Jordan on 03/11/2015 11:30:33

Edited By Mike Jordan on 03/11/2015 11:33:06

01/11/2015 18:55:57

I have written a number of articles for Good Woodworking in past years. I gave up submitting articles when a sliding sash window article was ruined by an alteration to my drawings which made nonsense of the article, a window made to the altered drawing would have been useless.

Imagine my surprise five years down the line when I noticed my name on an advert for the magazine, my articles are being used again without a penny being paid to me! If you do have a go please make sure that you don't sign the publication agreement but insist on a single publication in a single magazine only for a single payment.

To further assist you, should be paid a minimum of £100.00 per published page including all photographs, my second reason for moving elsewhere was the bright idea that subscribers would in future be paid on a "per thousand words basis" and all photos would be used without payment. Times may be hard in the magazine game but using old copy to save money will only reduce the number of long term subscribers.

01/11/2015 18:54:32

I have written a number of articles for Good Woodworking in past years. I gave up submitting articles when a sliding sash window article was ruined by an alteration to my drawings which made nonsense of the article, a window made to the altered drawing would have been useless.

Imagine my surprise five years down the line when I noticed my name on an advert for the magazine, my articles are being used again without a penny being paid to me! If you do have a go please make sure that you don't sign the publication agreement but insist on a single publication in a single magazine only for a single payment.

To further assist you, should be paid a minimum of £100.00 per published page including all photographs, my second reason for moving elsewhere was the bright idea that contributers would in future be paid on a "per thousand words basis" and all photos would be used without payment. Times may be hard in the magazine game but using old copy to save money will only reduce the number of long term subscribers.

Edited By Mike Jordan on 01/11/2015 19:05:51

Thread: Another gate
20/10/2015 22:00:33

Hi Mailee

There is nothing wrong with the fit of the boards, its the thin edge boards that don't look right. If you measure from the centre of the centre board you get one result and if you measure from the joint between two boards you get a totally different appearance. You will still have boards of equal width at each side but they will always be greater in width than half a board. Try making a staff by marking board widths on a piece of timber which is wider than the door. Then place it on the door to be boarded and slide it side to side and see the results. The object is to get decent board widths at each side.

Its one of those things which is easy to demonstrate rather than explain in writing.

As an alternative to the staff just tack some short off cuts of boarding side by side on a piece of scrap timber and place it on top of the door to be boarded. Slide them half a board to either side and it should be clear.

Using your current system you could be forced to use edge boards only a few mm wide.

Mike

20/10/2015 19:47:56

Hi Mailee

At risk of causing offence let me make a suggestion that will avoid your gates having those narrow bits of board at the sides.

If you move the boards on this gate half a board to the right, the outer boards will then be about three quarters of a board wide. The appearance will be much improved and the gates look much more professional. (only my opinion of course) Its one of those things which is blindingly obvious when once you have done it but is often missed by even aged makers like me!

Using this method its impossible to have outer boards half a board width or less no matter what the gate width.

Try it on your next gate

Mike.

Edited By Mike Jordan on 20/10/2015 19:56:09

Thread: what glue
06/10/2014 10:51:28

Hi Dennis

I strongly advise you to use a resin based two pack like west epoxy or a polyurethane glue.

I regularly use teak and iroko when making boat fittings and furniture. degreasing and using PVA will only hold for the short term and will fail!

If you don't work with teak frequently you may find the blunting effect on cutters to be a real problem. The amount of silica in the teak varies but can cause blunting on for instance planer knives. A pass over the planer of only about 2 metres will take the edge off in a big way unless you have tungsten carbide knives.

Best of luck with the project.

Mike.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Good Woodworking or The Woodworker? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Good Woodworking & The Woodworker

Email News - Join our newsletter

Love Woodworking? Sign up to our emails for the latest news and special offers!

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Peter Sefton IMPROVE FAST LONG
Chris Tribe Furniture
Felder UK April 2016
Transwave 2017
Triton
D&M Tools
D B Keighley
Tool Post
Chippendale
Turners Tool Box
Subscription Offers

Subscribe to<br />    The Woodworker Magazine and receive a FREE gift

Contact Us

We're always happy to hear from you, so feel free to get in touch!

Click here to find who to contact